Makers of "Last Men in Aleppo" battle to make it to Oscars

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Makers of "Last Men in Aleppo" battle to make it to Oscars

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The "White Helmet" rescuers in Syria have been on our news bulletins for years now, saving lives during the civil war. Who are they?

Director Firas Fayyad spent four years with them in Aleppo filming their every move, to tell their story. His film has been nominated for an Oscar this year, but Fayaad and producer Kareem Abeed will not be in Hollywood with their movie, as they are Syrian, and hit by the Trump travel ban.

This is their second documentary, focussed on the lives of the White Helmets themselves.

"They are like us, people who are trying to help others, trying to give a hand to whoever needs it, to save people under the rubble. These people have no agenda, helping everyone, even the soldiers of the Syrian regime. They have saved the lives of several soldiers," says the producer of "Last Men in Aleppo", Kareem Abeed.

Some claim the White Helmets have ties to terror groups, or hide Assad's war crimes.

"Last Men in Aleppo" aims to shatter the myths.

"I think at first that this immigration law is to protect America from Syria, but for other countries, they have opened their doors to the Syrians, why does the US close these doors? I don't understand," adds Kareem.

Telling the story of Syria is important for the filmmakers, but being in Hollywood offers them another platform from which to get their message across.

"Of course this is the first Syrian documentary nominated at the Oscars, and for the photographers, producers and the people who work for this important film that reflects the conflict in Syria, it's important to be there and tell the people and meet more people to tell them about Syria."