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He is no Mick Jagger.

But when Labour opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn appeared at the famous Glastonbury Music Festival in southwest England on Saturday, he received a rock star’s welcome.

Some said he drew the biggest crowd there since the Rolling Stones performed in 2013.

Corbyn didn’t break into song but his message of peace and refugee rights went down a treat.





“I think we should adopt a maxim in life: that everyone we meet is unique, that everyone we meet knows something we don’t know, is slightly different to us in some ways,” Corbyn told his huge audience.

“Don’t see them as a threat. Don’t see them as an enemy. See them as a source of knowledge, a source of friendship and a source of inspiration.”



Glastonbury got political on Friday’s opening night when Britain’s Radiohead returned to the Pyramid Stage, 20 years after a legendary performance at the festival.

Their set mocked Prime Minister Theresa May’s election campaign.

Singer Thom Yorke changed the lyric at the end of the song “Myxomatosis” to “strong and stable”, apparently making fun of a slogan that May repeated many times.



“See you later Theresa,” Yorke told revellers in one of his few addresses to the crowd.

“Shut the door on the way out.”

May has yet to form a stable government in Britain, more than two weeks after an inconclusive general election.


with Reuters