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British PM Theresa May pledges to clamp down on soaring CEO salaries

Theresa May has pledged to make it more difficult for foreign companies to take over UK firms.

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British PM Theresa May pledges to clamp down on soaring CEO salaries

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Theresa May has pledged to make it more difficult for foreign companies to take over UK firms. The British prime minister has threatened to clamp down on soaring executive pay as she set out her main campaign pledges ahead of next month’s snap national election.

Under her plan, executive pay packages would be subject to shareholder approval and listed companies would have to publish a comparison between executive salaries and pay for ordinary workers.

Unveiling her main pre-election pledges on Thursday (May 18) the PM said: “We need that strong and stable leadership now more than ever. For the next five years will be among the most challenging in our lifetime. A defining period for our nation. A turning point for Britain that will determine the kind of country we are and the kind of future the generations that come after us will see.”

In its election manifesto, Labour says it will crack down on tax avoidance, and people earning more than the equivalent of 82,000 euros a year will pay more tax.

Leader of the Liberal Democrats Tim Farron said his party would give Britons a say on the final Brexit deal struck with the European Union after two years of talks. He said a bad agreement would wreck Britain’s future.

“Someone is going to have the final say over the final Brexit deal,” said Farron. “It could be the politicians or it could be the people. I believe it must be the people.”

The Lib Dems are hopeful that their pro-EU stance will attract support from the 48 percent of Britons who backed remaining in the bloc in last year’s referendum.

Gap narrows between Tories and Labour

May’s Conservative (Tory) Party has a 15 point lead over the opposition Labour party, down sharply from three weeks ago but still indicating a hefty majority for her, an Ipsos MORI poll showed.

The Conservatives’ share of voters was steady at 49 percent, but Labour’s increased by 8 points from three weeks ago to 34 percent, according to the poll commissioned by the London Evening Standard newspaper.

Support for the Liberal Democrats halved to 7 percent, while the UK Independence Party’s share ebbed to just 2 percent.

In its election manifesto, Labour says it will crack down on tax avoidance, and people earning more than the equivalent of 82,000 euros a year will pay more tax. and crack down on tax avoidance.