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Amputee event in Baku raises awareness for International Mine Day

A World War II reenactment event in Bowling Green, Ky., on Saturday, Oct. 1, 2022.
A World War II reenactment event in Bowling Green, Ky., on Saturday, Oct. 1, 2022. Copyright Grace Ramey/AP
Copyright Grace Ramey/AP
By Euronews with AP
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"Mines are a huge global problem," said Vugar Suleymanov, Chairman of the Board of the Mine Action Agency of Azerbaijan.

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International Day for Mine Awareness has been celebrated at Baku’s Olympic stadium with a charity amputee football match.

The majority of players sustained their injuries from landmines.

"Today we went on to the field to say 'no' to the mines, to warn people not to enter prohibited areas for their safety, and to highlight that the mines should be cleaned," said amputee football player Senan Haciyev. 

"I call on everyone to stay safe."

While Africa is the continent most severely affected by landmines, Europe is hugely impacted too. 

It's estimated that one-third of Ukraine's territory has been mined.

Charities have called for more global action.

"Mines are a huge global problem," said Vugar Suleymanov, Chairman of the Board of the Mine Action Agency of Azerbaijan. "[The] international community of course has to pay attention to this problem and we have to struggle with this problem altogether."

Antonio Guterres, Secretary-General of the UN, also previously spoke about the problem: "For the millions living amidst the chaos of armed conflicts — especially women and children — every step can put them in danger’s path."

"Even after the fighting stops, conflicts often leave behind a terrifying legacy: landmines and explosive ordnance that litter communities." 

"On this International Day, let’s take action to end the threat of these devices of death, support communities as they heal, and help people return and rebuild their lives in safety and security," he added. 

It’s estimated there could be as many as 10 million landmines spread in 64 countries worldwide

Two to five million more are laid each year.

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