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Turkey freezes assets of 770 people over alleged links to ‘terror groups’

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By Euronews  with AP
This summer Turkey marked the fifth anniversary of the failed coup attempt
This summer Turkey marked the fifth anniversary of the failed coup attempt   -   Copyright  Burhan Ozbilici/AP

Turkey has frozen the assets of 770 Turkish nationals, hundreds of whom have links to the Gulen foundation, led by a cleric which Turkey accuses of being behind a 2016 coup attempt.

On 15 July that year, a faction of the Turkish army attempted to overthrow the government, resulting in deadly clashes.

Tens of thousands of people took to the streets in support of the president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, stopping the coup.

At least 251 people died during the night of violence, according to official figures, and mass arrests followed with thousands of people detained, accused of being part of the plot to overthrow the government.

The Turkish government accused Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen, who lives in the United States, of masterminding the attempted coup. Gulen has denied this.

The list of targets published by Turkey on Friday includes 454 people with alleged links to Gulen.

Gulen is the honorary president of the Chicago foundation that had its assets in Turkey frozen.

The Niagara Foundation’s parent organization, the Alliance for Shared Values, is a nonprofit of the Gulen movement, which Turkey designated as a terror group.

The list published Friday also shows 119 other people had assets frozen for links to the Islamic State group, Al-Qaeda, the al-Nusra Front and other alleged “terror groups that abuse religion.”

Another 108 people were targeted for alleged links to the Kurdistan Workers’ Party or PKK, which is designated a terror group by Turkey and the United States.

Eighty-nine people with alleged links to leftist groups designated as terror organisations were also listed in the ruling.

The decision was signed by Turkey's interior, treasury and finance ministers.