BREAKING NEWS
This content is not available in your region
Jewish children at the Izieu children's home, France, shortly before they were deported to death camps on April 6, 1944
Jewish children at the Izieu children's home, France, shortly before they were deported to death camps on April 6, 1944   -   Copyright  AFP

Photos of the Holocaust: What Nazi family albums and propaganda images tell us today

The anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp, January 27, is the day chosen by UN as International Holocaust Remembrance Day to honour the memory of six million Jewish victims killed by the Nazis.

This selection of archive photographs that recorded the suffering of Jewish victims of Holocaust during the WWII shows the deportation of Jewish men, women and children to Germany from France; the life in Warsaw Jewish Ghetto, the arrival and the suffering in the concentration camps and other stages of Jewish persecution by Nazi Germany.

AFP
Jewish deportees photographed in the Drancy transit camp, near Paris, their last stop before the German concentration camps. 1942AFP

Valeriy Miloserdov, a photo collection curator at Babyn Yar Holocaust Memorial Centre in Ukraine that commemorates the massacre of almost entire Jewish population of Kyiv between 1941 and 1943, says that photographs covering the Holocaust can be found in online auctions and flea markets, as well as in family archives around the world.

"It's most striking to look into those images that come from the Nazi family photo albums, as they reveal particularly well the attitude of those people had towards Jewish victims," he says.

Unlike the Soviet army soldiers, Nazis were allowed to carry a camera and the photographs they took tell the story of Holocaust events without any layers of propaganda. Those photographs could have been sent to the wives of Nazi soldiers like postcards. Printed with figured frames, they ended up in family albums, Valeriy explains.

Deportation process and arrival to concentration camps

AFP
Jewish men, wearing a yellow star, get their uniforms after arriving at the Drancy transit camp near Paris. 1942AFP
STF/AFP
Jewish women and children get off a train at Auschwitz - the Nazi concentration camp in Poland - during World War II. The precise date of the photograph is unknownSTF/AFP
AFP
An elderly woman with two children at Auschwitz, the Nazi concentration camp in Poland. The precise date of the photograph is unknownAFP

Warsaw Ghetto

AFP
A tram in the Warsaw Ghetto displays a star of David during Nazi occupation. The precise date of the photograph is unknownAFP
ARCHIVE/AFP
German soldiers arrest a Jewish man after the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising during WWII. April 1943ARCHIVE/AFP
AFP
A Nazi officer inspects a group of Jewish workers in the Warsaw Ghetto in Nazi-occupied Poland. April 1943AFP

The evidence of Nazi leadership war crimes

AFP
Nazi leader and war criminal Adolf Eichmann (2nd right) smiling while German officers cut a Jewish prisoner's hair locks in the Bergen-Belsen concentration campAFP

Children - victims of Holocaust

AFP
Jewish children at the Izieu children's home, France, shortly before they were deported to death camps on April 6, 1944AFP
AFP
A photo of the passport of Anna Frank lying on the top of the journals she wrote during her hiding from the Nazis in the attic apartment of a house in Amsterdam, NetherlandsAFP

Extermination camps

Yad Vashem Archives via AFP
Women deemed fit for work photographed in the Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination camp, in Auschwitz/Oswiecim. May 1944Yad Vashem Archives via AFP

Nazi retreats not far from concentration camps

US Holocaust Memorial Museum via AFP
Nazi female guards (Helferinnen) with Auschwitz concentration camp officer Karl Hoecker on a day-trip to a Nazi retreat in nearby Solahütte. 1944US Holocaust Memorial Museum via AFP
US Holocaust Memorial Museum via AFP
A social gathering of the Nazi hierarchy during a retreat in Solahütte near Auschwitz. 1944US Holocaust Memorial Museum via AFP

Concentration camps after their liberation

27 January 1945/AFP
Prisoners of the Buchenwald concentration camp pose for a photo when the Red Army re-staged the liberation of the camp a week after they had arrived without cameras27 January 1945/AFP
AFP
A pile of human bones and skulls is seen at the Nazi concentration camp of Majdanek in the outskirts of Lublin in Poland, following its liberation. July 1944AFP

Miloserdov says that photographic collections of Holocaust photographs are extremely valuable as photographs have an enormous capacity of influencing our emotions. This is unbiased evidence that has a powerful capacity to shape public opinions today so that genocides are not repeated.