COVID-19: Why hasn't Italy decided its Christmas lockdown strategy yet?

People wearing face masks to curb the spread of COVID-19 stroll along a shopping street decorated for Christmas, in downtown Rome, Monday, Dec. 14, 2020
People wearing face masks to curb the spread of COVID-19 stroll along a shopping street decorated for Christmas, in downtown Rome, Monday, Dec. 14, 2020 Copyright Cecilia Fabiano/LaPresse via AP
By Giorgia OrlandiAlessio Dell'Anna
Share this articleComments
Share this articleClose Button
Copy/paste the article video embed link below:Copy to clipboardCopied

The most probable scenario so far is a full-scale lockdown in two separate phases.

ADVERTISEMENT

The debate on whether to impose a full-scale lockdown in Italy this Christmas is still open - with only days left to go.

This week, Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte has been holding meetings with health experts, various party members and local governors to discuss which measures to impose.

Governors and experts are setting their sights on a nationwide lockdown to avoid mistakes made over summer; however, Conte is approaching this idea with caution due to economic implications. 

Many options are still on the table, but so far, the most likely scenario would be two short lockdowns introduced at different times. 

The first would happen between December 24 and 27, and the second from December 31 to January 3.

Italy is currently Europe's worst-hit country in terms of COVID-19 deaths, accounting for more than 67,800 fatalities.

(Watch more on this story in the above player).

Share this articleComments

You might also like

Coronavirus: Italy surpasses UK to record worst COVID-19 death toll in Europe

Pope prays in surprise visit to Virgin Mary statue in Rome amid pandemic

Italy unveils new plan to improve worker safety after construction site disaster