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Germany arrests 12 over far right plot to attack Muslims, politicians

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Police cars park in front of a police station in Gelsenkirchen, Germany.
Police cars park in front of a police station in Gelsenkirchen, Germany.   -   Copyright  AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File
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Germany has arrested 12 men on suspicion of involvement in a "right-wing terrorist group".

Federal prosecutors announced on Friday that four individuals, suspected of founding a "terrorist organisation" in September 2019, had been detained.

The group allegedly planned to carry out attacks on "politicians, asylum seekers, and persons of the Muslim faith".

Prosecutors say that the group intended "to bring about civil war-like conditions" in Germany.

"The aim of the association is said to have been to shake up and ultimately overcome the state and social order of the Federal Republic".

The four main suspects are believed to have organised several group meetings via phone and various messaging services.

Eight others were arrested on suspicion of "financially supporting the association, to procure weapons or to participate in future attacks."

In a statement, the Federal Prosecutor confirmed that the 12 individuals will be brought before the investigating judge of the Federal Supreme Court.

Police searched premises linked to the suspects in 13 different locations in six states Friday.

Prosecutors said these raids turned up sufficient evidence for authorities to formally seek arrest warrants against the suspects.

Research published by the Global Terrorism Index in 2019 found that far-right terrorism has increased in the West by 320% in the last five years.

Two people were killed and several others injured in an 'anti-semitic' attack in Halle in October.

Authorities say the shooting targeted a synagogue in the East Geman city.

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