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New Zealand's Williamson pleased countback rule gone

New Zealand's Williamson pleased countback rule gone
FILE PHOTO: Cricket - England Nets - Bay Oval, Mount Maunganui, New Zealand - November 19, 2019 New Zealand's Kane Williamson during a Maori welcome ceremony before nets REUTERS/Ross Setford -
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ROSS SETFORD(Reuters)
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WELLINGTON (Reuters) – New Zealand captain Kane Williamson says he was pleased to see the back of the controversial boundary countback rule, which gave England victory over his side in the World Cup final earlier this year.

England won their first 50-over World Cup title in July after the scores at the end of the final and a super over were tied. Eoin Morgan’s side hit 26 boundaries to New Zealand’s 17.

The International Cricket Council scrapped the rule last month, with teams now due to play super overs until a winner is found.

“It was hard to take,” Williamson told reporters at Bay Oval on Wednesday, a day before his side’s first test against England. “But at the same time, despite not agreeing how they would decide on a result, it was already in place.

“It’s not really a surprise (the rule was changed). I genuinely think that no one ever thought that was going to happen and it did.

“For it to actually happen is a pretty scary thing. It’s not really cricket and I think both teams appreciated that.

“It was a fantastic game to be a part of and a really competitive match. I think everyone has played hundreds of games of cricket and never had one decided quite like that.”

The recently completed Twenty20 series against England was decided by a super over, with the tourists clinching a 3-2 victory with their win in the fifth game at Eden Park.

Williamson missed that series to rest a hip injury.

(Reporting by Greg Stutchbury; Editing by Peter Rutherford)

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