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'Arrogance, neglect and disdain': Uncle of 'murdered' Romanian teenager slams authorities

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Alexandru Cumpanaşu and his kidnapped niece, Alexandra Măceşanu, presumed dead.
Alexandru Cumpanaşu and his kidnapped niece, Alexandra Măceşanu, presumed dead. -
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Credit: Facebook/Alexandru Cumpanaşu
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The uncle of a kidnapped Romanian teenager has slammed the people who heard her desperate telephone calls for help.

Alexandra Măceşanu, 15, is presumed dead after a mechanic in southern Romania confessed to her killing, as well as that of an 18-year-old last seen in April.

It later emerged authorities took 19 hours to locate Măceşanu after she made three calls to the 112 emergency number.

The scandal has sparked outrage, the sacking of officials and the resignation of the country’s interior minister.

“Those who answered the emergency calls had appalling behaviour,” Alexandru Cumpanaşu, Măceşanu’s uncle, told Euronews.

“They showed nothing but arrogance, neglect, carelessness and disdain for my niece. They are unprepared, unable and unfit to do the job.”

Cumpanaşu published what he claims are the transcripts of Măceşanu’s calls to the emergency hotline in a bid to highlight alleged failings.

One of the operators told her: “How do you expect us to find you? Well, give me a landmark from where you are.”

Another operator said: “But, where do you know the guy (kidnapper) from? Come on, tell me.”

Calling for the second time, the victim is met by the same question.

Măceşanu then tries to offer more details, explaining how she got there, that she hitch-hiked, she was blindfolded on her way to the kidnapper’s house and that she was now locked up in a room.

The conversation drags on to the point where the 15-year old starts crying: “I’m scared, I’m scared! Please send someone.

The operator replies: “Come on now, I believe you.”

Măceşanu was then put on hold, while a policeman was put through and started asking the same questions on her whereabouts: “Where do you want us to come, miss? Come on, tell me.”

In her third and final call to the emergency line, she pleads the operator once again to send someone.

She is again transferred to the police station, where the officer appears to become irritated and tells Măceşanu that someone will rescue her in two minutes.

The case has sparked protests in Romania.

“The public’s response to this tragedy helped us a lot and many responded to my plea on Facebook for anyone who can provide information that would lead to capturing all those responsible,” said Cumpanaşu. “We have more information now coming from the public than from the authorities.”