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UK cyclist guilty over pedestrian's death

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By Euronews
UK cyclist guilty over pedestrian's death

<p>A former bicycle courier who knocked over and killed a mother of two in east London last year has been cleared of her manslaughter.</p> <p>Instead, 20-year-old Charlie Alliston, was found guilty of causing bodily harm by “wanton or furious driving”.</p> <p>Kim Briggs, 44, was crossing the road on her lunch break when Alliston collided with her at 18mph on his secondhand fixed-gear bike.</p> <p>She suffered serious head injuries and died a week later in hospital.</p> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Ex-courier convicted for mowing down woman on his track bike <a href="https://t.co/sWsqWE3ztD">https://t.co/sWsqWE3ztD</a></p>— The Guardian (@guardian) <a href="https://twitter.com/guardian/status/900369158528933890">August 23, 2017</a></blockquote><br /> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p> <p>Alliston later went online to defend himself following the crash, claiming Mrs Briggs was at fault before deleting the comment when he realised how serious her injuries were.</p> <p>He told the Old Bailey his comments had been stupid and not thought through.</p> <p>The verdict has created a mini storm on twitter – pedestrians versus cyclists.</p> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Genuinely terrifying level of anti-cyclist vitriol and threats of violence brought out by <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/CharlieAlliston?src=hash">#CharlieAlliston</a> case. Media handling it terribly</p>— Grunshaw (@MrGrunshaw) <a href="https://twitter.com/MrGrunshaw/status/900007035072380928">August 22, 2017</a></blockquote><br /> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Charlie alliston is the normal for cyclists. I have not met one that feels they need to obey the rules. Why can they go through stop lights?</p>— italiamucho (@dburns84uk) <a href="https://twitter.com/dburns84uk/status/898176857606164480">August 17, 2017</a></blockquote><br /> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">How on earth has Charlie Alliston got away with that!!!</p>— Charlotte Hurt (@_Charlotte_Hurt) <a href="https://twitter.com/_Charlotte_Hurt/status/900391068189036544">August 23, 2017</a></blockquote><br /> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p> <p>Alliston’s fixed-wheel track bike is the sort more commonly seen at an Olympic velodrome, being raced at great speeds.</p> <p>In evidence, he told jurors he had no idea there were regulations that “fixies” have to have front brakes for use on the road.</p> <p>In a statement read in court, Mr Briggs paid tribute to his “wonderful” wife, with whom he had a daughter aged 11 and a son aged 14.</p> <p>The case has raised questions about safety and responsibility on the road.</p>