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One million Brazilians march calling for President Rousseff to go

One million Brazilians march calling for President Rousseff to go
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By Euronews
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Brazilians have turned out in their thousands in cities across the country to march in protest at rising prices and corruption. An estimated one

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Brazilians have turned out in their thousands in cities across the country to march in protest at rising prices and corruption.

An estimated one million people took part in rallies calling for the president to be impeached.

Dilma Rousseff who is in her second term as leader is struggling to kick-start a sluggish economy.

“Many companies are closing, including mine because of the government is committing daylight robbery. I have two children and want a better world for them than the way things are right now,” said one woman.

While a fellow protester said:“This is a warning to the government, we want change – they change or we go back out on to the streets again.”

Rousseff is unlikely to be forced to quit but a fifth year of economic stagnation plus a multibillion-euro corruption scandal has angered many of her usual supporters.

“The government has formed a crisis cabinet to follow all the demonstrations that filled the main Brazilian cities. At government house the last few days have been dubbed “the end of the world week “. From the Petrobras scandal to the rate of inflation everything seems to be conspiring against the president,” said our reporter in San Paulo Rita Dantas Ferreira.

Here’s a map of today’s anti-government protests in Brazil with crowd estimates, by g1</a>. <a href="http://t.co/6ECrqg9GXG">http://t.co/6ECrqg9GXG</a> <a href="http://t.co/63HQ8lXnt7">pic.twitter.com/63HQ8lXnt7</a></p>&mdash; RioGringa (Riogringa) March 15, 2015

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