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A land artist in northern Italy turned a field of wheat stubble into a portrait of author George Orwell to mark the 120th anniversary of his birth.
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Video. Italian land artist turns wheat field into portrait of George O

A land artist in northern Italy turned a field of wheat stubble into a portrait of author George Orwell to mark the 120th anniversary of his birth.

A land artist in northern Italy turned a field of wheat stubble into a portrait of author George Orwell to mark the 120th anniversary of his birth.

Orwell was born on June 25, 1903, in Motihari, India and died in London in 1950.

His most famous works “1984” and “Animal Farm” are still widely read today.

Working off a rough sketch, artist Dario Gambarin used a tractor, plough and rotary harrow to carve the portrait into the field.

“I wanted to dedicate this colossal portrait to Orwell," Gambarin said in a written statement, "because the world we live in today increasingly restricts our privacy as he had predicted in 1984.”

Gambarin’s land art has included figures from art and politics, both living and dead.

Among his land art portraits are former US President Barack Obama, Pope Francis, Leonardo Da Vinci, Dostoevsky and environmental activist Greta Thunberg.

The artwork was cut into a 27,000-square-meter plot of land near Verona, Italy.

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