Cristiano Ronaldo and girlfriend Georgina Rodriguez may be allowed to break Saudi Arabian law

Cristiano Ronaldo and Georgina Rodriguez may be excused from Saudi Arabia's laws which forbid unmarried couples to live together
Cristiano Ronaldo and Georgina Rodriguez may be excused from Saudi Arabia's laws which forbid unmarried couples to live together   -   Copyright  AP Photo
By Theo Farrant

Saudi Arabia is known for its strict laws and cultural customs, and one of them forbids unmarried individuals from living with each other, but that could be all about to change! At least, if you're Cristiano Ronaldo.

The Portuguese superstar recently completed a mega-money move to the Middle East, joining the Saudi Arabian team Al-Nassr FC on a two-and-a-half year deal worth an estimated €200 million a year.

He also took with him his Spanish supermodel and social media influencer girlfriend, Georgina Rodríguez. But the big question on many people's mind is, will they be allowed to live together in the country?

Well, Saudi legal experts have reportedly confirmed that the Saudi authorities will "turn a blind eye" to accommodate for one of the greatest football players of all time, allowing him and his partner to settle into their first luxury property together. 

According to Spanish news outlet EFE, Ronaldo's status makes a punishment highly unlikely. The agency also cited opinions from two Saudi lawyers, who stated that authorities are unlikely to take any legal action against the legendary player, who previously played for Real Madrid, Juventus and Manchester United.

"The Saudi Arabian authorities, today, do not interfere in this matter [in the case of foreigners], but the law continues to prohibit cohabitation outside of marriage", another added.

But while the couple may be allowed to live with one another, they will have to be aware of and respect the other cultural norms and laws of the country. 

Laws in Saudi Arabia are quite different from those in Europe, and can be much stricter, particularly when it comes to criminal justice, human rights, women's rights, LGBT rights and religious freedom.

In particular, Rodríguez will have to follow the dress codes in the country, where women are expected to dress conservatively and cover their shoulders and knees in public.

However, it's important to note that Saudi Arabia has been taking steps in recent years to modernise and open up to the world, so it's possible that the laws and customs may change in the future.

Video editor • Theo Farrant