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The Kiss comes to life for the visually impaired

The Kiss comes to life for the visually impaired
By Euronews

<p><em>The Kiss</em> by Gustav Klimt is probably the most famous painting in Vienna, with over a million people viewing the masterpiece at the <a href="https://www.belvedere.at/en">Belvedere Museum</a> each year. </p> <p>The iconic image is now available to blind and visually impaired people thanks to a EU-funded project which has created a <a href="https://www.belvedere.at/bel_en/exhibition/gustav_klimts_kiss_at_your_fingertips_">3D relief version</a>.</p> <p>Dominika Raditsch was one of the first blind people to experience the touchable version of the painting. She lost her vision at age four due to a serious eye infection.</p> <p>Dominika Raditsch, museum visitor:<br /> “It’s somehow round. It’s entangled. It’s round. You can feel it. You can feel it, it comes with it. And in many places it’s so smooth. And then I think to myself: ‘It probably shines too!’ I can’t see it, but that’s what I think. It pretty much incites the imagination.”</p> <p>Touching the relief recreates Klimt’s image in Dominika’s mind’s eye. Her fingers operate as a medium between the 3D reproduction and her brain.</p> <p>Andreas Reichinger has been working on the touchable 3D reliefs project for five years now.</p> <p>Andreas Reichinger, scientist and 3D relief creator:<br /> “<em>The Kiss</em> so far was my most difficult exhibit. There are very figurative and physical parts. And on the other hand, there are these very flat and ornamental areas.”</p> <p>The Belvedere Museum, in partnership with the EU-funded <span class="caps">AMBAV</span>is project (Access to Museums for Blind and Visually Impaired People), is now planning to provide an interactive audio guide for the blind.</p> <p>Cameras and sensors will be used to ensure that the part of the relief that’s being touched will be explained.</p> <p>The museum is home to the world’s largest collection of Klimt oil paintings.</p>