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Gwyneth Paltrow's lawyer brands ski hit-and-run accusations 'utter BS'

Actor Gwyneth Paltrow looks on as she sits in the courtroom on Tuesday, March 21, 2023, in Park City, Utah.
Actor Gwyneth Paltrow looks on as she sits in the courtroom on Tuesday, March 21, 2023, in Park City, Utah. Copyright Rick Bowmer/Copyright 2023 The AP. All rights reserved.
Copyright Rick Bowmer/Copyright 2023 The AP. All rights reserved.
By Euronews with AP
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American actress Gwyneth Paltrow appeared in court in Utah on Tuesday for the start of a civil trial over claims she seriously injured a man in a skiing accident in 2016.

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A lawyer for American actress Gwyneth Paltrow dismissed claims made by a retired optometrist who is suing her over a 2016 ski crash as "utter BS", as the Hollywood star appeared in court in Utah for the start of a civil trial on Tuesday.

Paltrow is accused of recklessly slamming into Terry Sanderson, 76, and leaving him unresponsive before skiing away. Sanderson is suing Paltrow for over €270,000 — claiming that the accident in Park City was a result of negligence, and left him with physical injuries and emotional distress.

Paltrow is counter-suing, claiming he hit her with a "full body blow". She claims Sanderson is trying to exploit her celebrity and wealth. Her counterclaim seeks a symbolic $1 in damages plus legal fees.

The incident took place at Deer Valley, one of the most upscale ski resorts in the United States.

“All skiers know that when they’re skiing down the mountain, it’s their responsibility to yield the right of way to skiers below them,” Sanderson’s attorney, Lawrence Buhler, told jurors.

On ski slopes, Utah law gives the skier who is downhill the right of way, so a central question in the case is who was farther down when the collision transpired. 

Both Paltrow and Sanderson claim that they were farther downhill when the other rammed into them.

The trial is expected to last eight days.

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