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Where can I book a holiday in Europe during lockdown?

Dreaming of Paris or Rome? We'll help you figure out where you can and can't travel to in Europe right now.
Dreaming of Paris or Rome? We'll help you figure out where you can and can't travel to in Europe right now.   -   Copyright  Euronews   -  
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With COVID-19 cases on the rise and many European countries enforcing tighter restrictions - and even full lockdowns - it can get confusing if you’re trying to book a winter getaway.

Don’t worry - we’ve got you covered. We’ve looked into the COVID-19 situation across European countries to take the headache out of your travel planning.

We have listed the restrictions for EU and non-EU citizens for all European countries. We have also noted restrictions for third-countries - these are any countries which aren't in the EU/Schengen area.

We’ll be monitoring the situation closely and regularly updating the information on this page.

Austria

  • Austria is currently under a national lockdown until 30 November
  • Curfews remain in place (8pm-6am) until 13th November
  • Borders are open, but unnecessary travel is advised against
  • Hotels remain open for business travellers only
  • All restaurants, pubs and cafes are closed and can only offer a takeaway service.
  • Culture and leisure facilities - cinemas, museums, galleries, theatres etc. - are closed during the lockdown. Christmas markets will not take place until 30 November
  • Ski resort openings have been postponed until December

Belgium

The tourism sector is open with some restrictions in place:

  • Belgium has a traffic light system in place to determine what restrictions you will need to adhere to.
  • The majority of Europe has been placed in the red zone, meaning you'll need to quarantine for 10 days upon arrival.
  • All tourist and hotel accommodation is open, but guests are only allowed to eat in their rooms
  • Bars and restaurants are only allowed to offer takeaway service and alcohol cannot be purchased after 8pm
  • Most tourist attractions remain open with COVID-19 guidelines in place
  • Zoos and theme parks are closed until 13 December. Additional restrictions may apply at a regional level, so check before you travel
  • Tourists in Brussels can look out for a handy ‘safety label’ on attractions, restaurants, accommodation and leisure facilities, which shows where government guidelines are being met.

Travelling to and from Belgium

  • Anybody travelling to Belgium by plane or boat must complete a passenger locator form. Other forms of transport are exempt if you’re in the country for less than 48 hours.

From inside the EU/Schengen area

  • If you’re travelling to Belgium from a red zone you’ll need to quarantine for 10 days.

From outside the EU/Schengen area

  • Entering Belgium from a third-country is prohibited. Much like Austria, Belgium will consider travellers from third-countries on a case by case basis.

Travelling through Belgium

  • You are permitted to travel through Belgium as long as restrictions are respected
  • If you’re going to be in Belgium for more than 48 hours, you’ll need to complete a passenger locator form

More information on the Visit Belgium website.

Bulgaria

Bulgaria is currently open to tourists from specific countries as long as government guidelines are followed.

From the EU/Schengen area

  • Good news. Travellers from these zones may enter Bulgaria without any restrictions. You'll just need to fill out this declaration form.

From outside the EU/Schengen area

If you're coming from another third-country, you are only permitted to enter Bulgaria if you:

  • Have permanent status, long-term or long-term residence on the territory of the Republic of Bulgaria (including member of their families);
  • OR hold a Bulgarian long-stay visa type "D", as well as a residence permit in a EU+ country (including member of their families)
  • AND have submitted a negative PCR test, which was taken no longer than 72 hours before arrival.

Croatia

Most of the tourism sector is open in Croatia with measures such as good hygiene, social distancing and face masks in place.

  • Restaurants, bars and cafes can operate from 06:00 to midnight.

From the EU/Schengen area

  • All travellers to Croatia are required to fill out the ‘Enter Croatia’ form. Croatian citizens are allowed to re-enter the country from abroad without any additional restrictions.

From outside the EU/Schengen area

  • Third-country nationals can enter Croatia for business or tourism and are subject to restrictions
  • A negative PCR test, no more than 48 hours old at the time of arrival, is required. If you don’t present this test at the border, you’ll have to self-isolate for 14 days.

Travel through Croatia

You are allowed to travel through Croatia as long as you’re going to a neighbouring country and will spend no more than 12 hours in Croatia.

Border forces will check that you have left the country in this time limit. More information here.

Cyprus

Cyprus is open to tourists and restrictions depend on where you’re travelling from.

  • Hotels, restaurants and bars, and the majority of tourist attractions are open
  • Face masks, social distancing and good hygiene practices are mandatory
  • You can see more about the advice for travellers here
  • All travellers will need to complete a passenger locator form to enter Cyprus.

Travel to Cyprus

Cyprus has a category system from A-C, and restrictions apply accordingly:

  • Category A - travellers from these countries are only asked to provide from specific information and a declaration form
  • Category B - travellers must provide a declaration form and a negative PCR test upon arrival (which has to be done no more than 72 hours before)
  • Category C - in addition to a declaration form and negative PCR test upon arrival, travellers from

Category C countries must self-isolate for 14 days and then complete another PCR test at their own expense 48 hours before the end of the quarantine.

There’s more information here.

Czech Republic

  • The Czech Republic is currently under lockdown and has banned all but essential travel
  • A night curfew between 21:00 and 05:00 is in place.

Denmark

Head to the home of Hygge this winter.

  • Most of the tourism and hospitality industry is open in Denmark with restrictions in place
  • In most areas, social distancing and hygiene must be observed and face masks are mandatory. Restaurants and bars are open between 05:00 and 22:00.

From the EU/Schengen area

  • You can enter Denmark without restrictions from these countries unless they are deemed to be ‘high risk.

From outside the EU/Schengen area

  • Borders are open to certain third-countries depending on their COVID-19 situation
  • You’re only allowed to travel from a ‘banned country’ in exceptional circumstances and if you can provide a negative PCR test that was performed no more than 72 hours before arrival.
Nick Karvounis/Unsplash
Copenhagen, DenmarkNick Karvounis/Unsplash

Estonia

Get back to nature in Estonia this autumn! Tourist accommodation is open with some COVID-19 measures in place.

From the EU/Schengen area

  • Travellers from EU/Schengen states are allowed to enter Estonia without restrictions as long as the COVID-19 incidence rate in they are not showing any symptoms and their country hasn’t exceeded 25** cases per 100,000 inhabitants** in the last 14 days
  • You can check that information here.

From outside the EU/Schengen area

Estonia permits travellers from the following third-countries only: Australia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Uruguay and Singapore.

Finland

All restaurants, cafes and bars must close by 23:00 and visitor numbers will be limited for social distancing purposes.

From the EU/Schengen area

  • Similarly to Estonia, you can enter Finland without the need to test or self-isolate if where you’re travelling from has a maximum of 25 new COVID-19 cases per 100,000 persons during the previous 14 days.

From outside the EU/Schengen area

  • Family members of Finnish citizens are allowed to enter the country regardless of where they’re travelling from
  • Otherwise, you can enter Finland with no restrictions if you’re travelling from one of the following countries: Australia, Japan, Rwanda, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand, New Zealand, and Uruguay
  • Starting from 23 November, arrivals to Finland from high-incidence areas (more than 25 new Covid-19 cases per 100,000 persons during the previous 14 days) are required to show evidence of a negative PCR test upon arrival
  • Passengers from high rate areas have to stay in mandatory quarantine for 14 days. If travellers are tested upon arrival and three days after arrival, the mandatory quarantine can be lifted if their test comes back negative.

France

The Eiffel Tower will have to wait, as France has re-entered full lockdown.

  • All non-essential shops and services are closed - this includes hotels
  • A night curfew between 21:00 and 06:00 is in place and only essential travel is allowed

Germany

The majority of Germany is subject to tight restrictions and hotels are closed to tourists until 30 November.

  • All bars, restaurants and cafes are closed - only offering takeaway services
  • There’s a regional breakdown of restrictions in Germany here.

Greece

Greece has reentered a national lockdown until 30 November.

  • Tourists are still technically allowed to enter the country for the time being, but they're subject to strict measures.
  • All non-essential shops and services are closed and you may only leave your accommodation for food, medical supplies or exercise.
  • If you are travelling to Greece, you'll need to provide a negative PCR test no more than 48 hours old and complete a passenger locator form. Failure to complete the form could lead to a €500 fine upon arrival in Greece,
Gaddafi Rusli/Unsplash
Greece coastlineGaddafi Rusli/Unsplash

Hungary

Hungary has banned non-essential travel at this time from all countries except for citizens of the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovakia (who must show evidence of a negative PCR test no more than 5 days old).

Iceland

Tourists are able to travel to Iceland at the moment under tight COVID-19 restrictions.

  • All pubs are currently closed and restaurants must close by 21:00
  • Stricter rules may apply to some of the more populated areas, such as Reykjaivik.

From the EU/Schengen area

All passengers must choose between either a 14-day quarantine OR a double-ended testing procedure with just a 6-day quarantine. All visitors need to complete a pre-registration form before coming to Iceland

From outside the EU/Schengen area

The same rules apply to third-countries. More information about Iceland’s “at risk” countries can be found here.

Ireland (Southern)

Unfortunately, the luck of the Irish isn’t with us on this one.

  • Hotels and other tourist accommodation is only open to support essential services
  • All non-essential shops and services are closed and outdoor spaces are subject to social distancing measures
  • Restaurants, bars and cafes can only operate a takeaway service
  • You can keep up to date with Ireland’s travel restrictions here.

Italy

  • The advice in Italy is: check the region you’re travelling to before you go. Italy has been categorised into three risk-levels
  • In most areas, hotels and tourist accommodation is open for business, providing government restrictions are followed
  • Some regions in Italy have been placed under tougher measures due to a spike in cases.

From the EU/Schengen area

  • All tourists are required to complete a self-declaration form upon arrival to Italy, but there’s no other restrictions.

From outside the EU/Schengen area

  • Travellers from Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia and Uruguay are allowed to enter for any reason as long as they fill out a self-declaration form
  • Travellers from Armenia, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Kuwait, Oman, Panama, Peru and Dominican Republic are allowed to enter only if they are EU citizens (including their family members) who have been resident in Italy
  • For those coming from other third-countries, only essential travel is allowed
  • All third-country travellers will need to fill out a self-declaration form, quarantine, and reach their final destination in Italy on a private vehicle (due to self-isolation requirements)

More information here.

Latvia

  • Latvia is open for business with some restrictions in place
  • You may enter Latvia without restrictions if the incidence rate of COVID-19 in the country you’re travelling from has not exceeded 14** cases per 100,000 people in the last 14 days. Otherwise, you might need to self-isolate**
  • You can check if you would need to self-isolate in Latvia here
  • Wherever you’re travelling from though, you must confirm in writing that you will adhere to Latvia’s COVID-19 measures during your trip.

Liechtenstein

The travel and hospitality sector is operating with some COVID-19 restrictions in place.

From the EU/Schengen area

  • You can enter Liechtenstein from any of these countries without any restrictions if they are not defined as a ‘COVID risk area - in which case, you’ll need to quarantine for 10 days on arrival.

From outside the EU/Schengen area

  • Liechtenstein is following the same COVID-19 restrictions as Switzerland and regularly updates a list of countries which require additional restrictions.

Lithuania

In Lithuania, the hospitality industry is operating with local restrictions in place and can serve customers between 07:00 and midnight in most places.

  • Travel restrictions for Lithuania depend on how your country ranks in the traffic light system. If you’re travelling from countries coloured red or grey, you’ll be required to either take a COVID-19 test or isolate for 10 days upon arrival
  • All travellers are required to submit their information to the National Public Health Centre before they arrive.
  • Due to the recent discovery of SARS-CoV-2 mutations in mink farms in the following countries, arrivals to Lithuania will be asked to show a negative PCR test no older than 48 hours: Denmark, Spain, Italy, the Netherlands, Sweden and the United States.

Luxembourg

Luxembourg's official tourism website recommends tourists follow the travel advice of their own country. Having said that, a little trip to Luxembourg might be on the cards as most of the travel and hospitality sector is open for business.

There are COVID-19 restrictions such as social distancing and extra sanitisation practices.

From the EU/Schengen area

Arrivals from EU/Schengen countries can enter Luxembourg without any restrictions

From outside the EU/Schengen area

Travellers from certain third-countries are allowed to visit Luxembourg without needing to take a PCR test providing they carry proof of their residency in one of the following: Australia, China, Hong Kong and Macao (subject to confirmation of reciprocity at EU level), Japan, New Zealand, Ruanda, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand and Uruguay.

Marc Marchal/Unsplash
Bourscheid Castle, Bourscheid, LuxembourgMarc Marchal/Unsplash

Malta

Some winter sun in Malta is definitely in order and - good news - they’re open to holiday-makers. The usual COVID-19 safety measures apply here.

  • Tourists from any of the listed travel corridor countries can go to Malta without any additional restrictions, providing they’ve been in one of those countries for a minimum of 14 days
  • If you’re travelling from a country which isn’t on the list of corridors, you can only do so for essential travel
  • You’ll need to provide a negative PCR test performed no more than 72 hours before your arrival. Failing this, you’ll be asked to take a test upon your arrival and isolate.

Netherlands

Tourist accommodation is open in the Netherlands. However restaurants, cafes and bars are closed and only offering takeaway services

Norway

You can grab a drink and a bite to eat in restaurants, bars and cafes up until 22:00 in Norway, and tourist accommodation is open with the usual COVID-19 measures in place.

Poland

Tourists are advised not to travel to Poland for the duration of their "circuit breaker" lockdown which is in place until 30 November.

Portugal

Go and see for yourself why Portugal cleaned up at The World Travel Awards this year, as most of the travel and leisure industry is open for business and they have introduced a 'clean and safe' stamp mark for the tourism industry.

You just can’t buy an alcoholic drink after 20:00 and all bars, restaurants and cafes must be closed by 01:00. There are additional restrictions in places such as Azores and Madeira, so check the tourism website before you plan your trip.

From the EU/Schengen area

  • If you’re travelling from any of these countries (except for Madeira and Azores), you can enter Portugal without any restrictions
  • If you’re coming from Madeira or Azores, you’ll need to have proof of a negative PCR test performed 72 hours before arrival or self-isolate and take a test upon entry.

From outside the EU/Schengen area

  • Travel to Portugal is only allowed for essential journeys if you’re coming from third-countries. You’ll need to provide evidence of a negative PCR test which was carried out 72 hours before arrival
  • Visitors from Australia, China, South Korea, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, Thailand and Uruguay are subject to the same rules as EU/Schengen area states.

Romania

  • Romania is open for business with the usual restrictions in the travel, leisure and hospitality sectors
  • You can enter Romania without restrictions unless it’s on the list of high risk countries, in which case you’ll be asked to quarantine.

Slovakia

  • There’s no guarantee of tourist accommodation being open in Slovakia, so check before you travel
  • Only outdoor restaurants can serve guests with social distancing measures in place
  • You can travel to Slovakia without restrictions if you’re coming from a country listed on the Slovak Ministry of Foreign Affairs website
  • If you’re arriving from a country not included on the list, you’ll be asked to quarantine and take a PCR test.

Slovenia

Tourists can visit Slovenia but in some regions tighter restrictions are in force, meaning you might not be able to sit in a restaurant for a meal or visit a pub.

Slovenia divides countries into three categories which determine the level of restrictions on travellers arriving to the country:

  • Green list - People arriving from these countries can enter Slovenia without restrictions or quarantine
  • Red list - People entering Slovenia from ‘red list’ countries need to quarantine for 10 days unless they have a negative PCR test which is no older than 48 hours
  • Orange list - If a country is not on either the red or green lists, it will be included on the orange list. People arriving to Slovenia from an EU/Schengen state that has been included on the orange list can enter Slovenia without restrictions or quarantine. Anybody arriving from outside these zones must have a negative PCR test no older than 48 hours upon arrival.

Spain

A quick getaway to Spain is tempting as the winter weather sets in.

  • Hotels, restaurants, bars and attractions are open with restrictions
  • If you’re looking for the best chance of an escape, you might be better off heading to one of the quieter regions where restrictions at restaurants, bars and cafes could be slightly more relaxed than in built up areas.

From the EU/Schengen area

  • If you’re travelling from an EU/Schengen state, you can enter Spain without any restrictions. You will be required to have your temperature taken upon arrival and you’ll need to fill out the Public Health Form, which can also be found on the free ‘Spain Travel Health’ app.

From outside the EU/Schengen area

  • If you’re from any of the following countries, you will be able to enter Spain: Australia, Canada, China, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia and Uruguay
  • There’s more information about travelling to Spain from outside the EU on the official tourism website.

Sweden

Head to Sweden and embrace your inner-Scandi at some of the mountain cabins open during the pandemic.

  • Most tourist accommodation is open with restrictions on numbers to enable social distancing
  • Restaurants and bars are operating in the same way.

From the EU/Schengen area

  • You can enter Sweden without any restrictions.

From outside the EU/Schengen area

  • If you plan on visiting from outside the EU, you won’t be travelling to Sweden just yet. There’s a ban on all but essential travel for these countries. For more information, click here.

Switzerland

The land of great chocolate and cheese!

The country’s national ‘Clean and Safe’ campaign - which established safety protocols for service providers - means you can travel with confidence.

From the EU/Schengen area

  • You can enter Switzerland without any restrictions as long as your country isn’t on the 'high risk list', in which case, you’ll need to quarantine for 10 days once you arrive.

From outside the EU/Schengen area

  • At the moment, only essential travel from outside the EU or covid-risk areas is allowed to Switzerland. The State Secretariat for Migration (SEM) has more information.

United Kingdom

  • The UK is currently under a full lockdown until 2 December. Hotels are only open for business or essential workers and all but essential travel has been advised against.
  • If you are coming to the UK, you’ll need to complete a passenger locator form and you’ll be legally required to self-isolate for 14 days unless your country is on the UK’s travel corridor list.
  • Restrictions vary across Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales, so check before you travel.