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One killed in Japan as typhoon makes landfall, millions advised to evacuate

One killed in Japan as typhoon makes landfall, millions advised to evacuate
Heavy rains caused by Typhoon Hagibis flood a residential area in Ise, central Japan, in this photo taken by Kyodo October 12, 2019. Mandatory credit Kyodo/via REUTERS -
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KYODO(Reuters)
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By Makiko Yamazaki and Kiyoshi Takenaka

TOKYO (Reuters) – One man was killed, over 30 people were injured and more than six million people were advised to evacuate as a powerful typhoon bore down on the Japanese capital on Saturday, bringing with it the heaviest rain and winds in 60 years.

Typhoon Hagibis, which means “speed” in the Philippine language Tagalog, made landfall on Japan’s main island of Honshu late on Saturday, threatening to flood low-lying Tokyo as it coincides with high tide.

The storm, which the government warned could be the strongest to hit Tokyo since 1958, has already brought record-breaking rainfall in Kanagawa prefecture south of Tokyo with a whopping 700 mm (27.6 inches) of rain over 24 hours.

The Japan Meteorological Agency issued the highest level of warning for some areas in Tokyo, Kanagawa and five other surrounding prefectures, warning of amounts of rain that occur only once in decades.

“We are seeing unprecedented rain,” an agency official told a news conference carried by public broadcaster NHK. “Damage from floods and landslides is likely taking place already.”

Many people in and around Tokyo were already taking shelter in temporary evacuation facilities.

Yuka Ikemura, a 24-year-old nursery school teacher, was in one such facility at a community centre in Edogawa in eastern Tokyo with her 3-year-old son, 8-month-old daughter and their pet rabbit.

She said she decided to move before it was too late.

“I’ve got small children to take care of and we live on the first floor of an old apartment,” Ikemura said.

“We brought with us the bare necessities. I’m scared to think about when we will have run out diapers and milk,” she told Reuters.

VULNERABLE

Tokyo’s Haneda airport and Narita airport in Chiba both stopped flights from landing and connecting trains were suspended, forcing the cancellation of more than a thousand flights, according to Japanese media.

Kanagawa prefecture officials said they would release water from the Shiroyama dam, southwest of Tokyo, and alerted residents in areas along nearby rivers.

Heavy winds have already caused some damage, particularly in Chiba east of Tokyo, where one of the strongest typhoons to hit Japan in recent years destroyed or damaged 30,000 houses a month ago.

A man in his forties was killed in an overturned car in the prefecture early on Saturday, while five people were injured as winds blew roofs off several houses, according to NHK. Several people were missing in a town near Tokyo after a landslide destroyed two houses, NHK said.

A number of municipal governments issued evacuation advisories to areas particularly at risk of floods and landslides, including some in the most populous Tokyo region.

Experts warned that Tokyo, while long conditioned to prepare for earthquakes, was vulnerable to flooding.

Tokyo, where 1.5 million people live below sea level, is prone to damage from storm surges, Nobuyuki Tsuchiya, director of the Japan Riverfront Research Centre, told Reuters.

“We are heading towards high tide. If the typhoon hits Tokyo when the tide is high, that could cause storm surges and that would be the scariest scenario,” he said. “People in Tokyo have been in a false sense of security.”

More than 60,000 households have lost power, including 14,900 in Chiba, which was hit hard by typhoon Faxai a month ago, the industry ministry said.

The Defence Ministry set up a new Twitter account to disseminate information on disaster relief efforts.

Stores, factories and subway systems have been shut down as a precaution, while Japanese Formula One Grand Prix organisers cancelled all practice and qualifying sessions scheduled for Saturday.

Two matches of the Rugby World Cup due to be played on Saturday were also cancelled.

Typhoon Ida, known as the “Kanogawa Typhoon” in Japanese, killed more than 1,000 people in 1958.

(Reporting by Makiko Yamazaki and Kiyoshi Takenaka; Editing by Paul Tait & Shri Navaratnam)

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