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Nissan wants Renault to reduce stake to revive Renault-FCA deal talks - WSJ

Nissan wants Renault to reduce stake to revive Renault-FCA deal talks - WSJ
The logos of car manufacturers Renault and Nissan are seen in front of dealerships of the companies in Reims, France, July 9, 2019. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann -
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Christian Hartmann(Reuters)
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(Reuters) – Carmakers Nissan Motor Co <7201.T> and Renault SA <RENA.PA> are trying to reach a deal to reshape their global alliance, in hopes of reviving Renault’s merger talks with Italy’s Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV <FCHA.MI>, the Wall Street Journal reported on Friday, citing emails and people briefed on the talks.

Nissan wants Renault to reduce its 43.4% stake in the Japanese auto company, according to emails reviewed by WSJ.

The discussions, which are at an early stage, started soon after the potential deal between Renault and FCA collapsed, the report added. Talks could extend until the end of the year.

The negotiations could lead to an initial memorandum of understanding on restructuring as early as September, the Journal reported, citing emails.

Nissan and FCA said they had no comment on the WSJ report. Renault was not immediately available for a comment.

FCA said in June that it had abandoned its $35 billion (£28.8 billion) merger offer for Renault, blaming French politics for scuttling the deal. The French government owns a 15% stake in Renault.

Reuters had reported in June that a revival of the collapsed merger plans of FCA and Renault may hinge on the French carmaker cutting its stake in Nissan.

(Reporting by Rishika Chatterjee and Kanishka Singh in Bengaluru; Editing by Sandra Maler)

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