This content is not available in your region

Iran nuclear deal is 'yes or no', no renegotiations possible, EU stresses

Access to the comments Comments
By AFP
EU Foreign Policy Chief Josep Borrell speaks to the press after a meeting of EU defence ministers at the European Council building in Brussels in Brussels, May 17, 2022.
EU Foreign Policy Chief Josep Borrell speaks to the press after a meeting of EU defence ministers at the European Council building in Brussels in Brussels, May 17, 2022.   -   Copyright  AP Photo/Olivier Matthys

The EU expects Tehran and Washington to take a "quick decision" on the final compromise worked out in Vienna to save the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, the spokesman for EU diplomatic chief Josep Borrell said Tuesday.

"Everything that could be negotiated has been incorporated into the final version of the text and it is now up to the signatory countries to take political decisions," Peter Stano told reporters.

"It's yes or no," he insisted. "There is no more room for other compromises," he said.

"As coordinator of the negotiations, Josep Borrell expects decisive political decisions. He has not set any deadline, but we expect all participants to make this decision very quickly," he said.

In the event of an agreement, he added, Borrell will convene a meeting of the foreign ministers of the signatory countries. 

"What can be negotiated has been negotiated, and it's now the final text," Borrell wrote on Twitter on Monday evening confirming the end of the talks held in Vienna since April 2021.

The pact, known by its acronym JCPOA, aims to guarantee the civilian nature of Iran's nuclear programme, accused of seeking to acquire nuclear weapons despite its denials.

But following the unilateral withdrawal from the agreement in 2018 by the United States under Donald Trump and the reinstatement of US sanctions that stifle its economy, Tehran has been gradually backing away from its obligations.

Iran said it was studying the 25-page text. The compromise allows the United States to return to the agreement with the lifting of sanctions on Tehran, provided Iran meets its commitments and stops exceeding prescribed limits on enrichment and other nuclear activities, Stano said.

The other signatories are Britain, China, France, Germany and Russia.

The 2015 agreement offered Iran relief from international sanctions in exchange for drastically limiting its nuclear programme, which is under strict UN control, and guarantees that it is not seeking to acquire an atomic bomb, as it has always claimed.