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Syria: Stopping the Bloodshed

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By Euronews
Syria: Stopping the Bloodshed

<p>Syria’s people-power uprising has turned into open warfare. After months of trying to crush a largely peaceful Arab Spring movement, and after more than 5,000 deaths, the Syrian regime is now battling an increasingly violent insurgency. </p> <p>Army defectors join the Free Syrian Army after refusing to fire on civilians who persist in their protests. </p> <p>Arab League observers have been pulled out, unable to stop the bloodshed, and criticised as providing cover for the regime of President Bashar al Assad. </p> <p>As the insurgency grows, so does the role of armed Islamic extremists and the threat of a devastating civil war. </p> <p>At the UN, Russia rejects talk of a Security Council resolution that could impose sanctions and perhaps lead to intervention. </p> <p>Western countries, who led a much-debated campaign of air-strikes that helped bring down Libya’s Muammar Gaddafi, are reluctant to get involved in yet another Arab conflict that could become a quagmire. </p> <p>Chris Burns talks to Veronique de Keyser, a Belgian <span class="caps">MEP</span>, a member of the Socialist party and the Parliament’s Foreign Affairs Committee. </p> <p>Also on the programme is Rudolph el Kareh, a Lebanese born political science professor and commentator on Arab World affairs. </p> <p>And joining them is Ammar Waqqaf, a leading voice of the British based Syrian Social Club and also a member of the Ba’ath party. He, and the Club call for reforms, and not for regime change.</p>