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Descend into colourful madness at Rome's latest immersive exhibition

A new art exhibition at Rome's Choistro del Bramante building, lets visitors revel in colourful, rebellious madness
A new art exhibition at Rome's Choistro del Bramante building, lets visitors revel in colourful, rebellious madness   -   Copyright  Credit: Choistro del Bramante   -  
By Theo Farrant  & AP

A modern twist to a Renaissance cloister.

In Rome, a building designed by Donato Bramante has been invaded by multi-coloured artificial walls made up of hair, flashing neon lights and human sculptures with huge rocks on their heads.

The exhibition, 'Crazy: Madness in Contemporary Art', has taken over the indoor and outdoor spaces of the Choistro del Bramante building, to display contemporary works in which visitors can immerse themselves.

"It is a small journey, a path through the territories of creativity, and therefore through the territories of joy, fantasy and imagination." says Danilo Eccher, curator of the exhibition.

The creative project is made up of 21 well-known, international artists, including the likes of Carlos Amorales, Petah Coyne, Ian Davenport, Janet Echelman and Lucio Fontana.

An immersive descent into madness

Credit: Ian Davenport Studio
A work by British artist Ian Davenport, titled ‘Poured Staircase', on display at the exhibitionCredit: Ian Davenport Studio

The artists were tasked to create works of different types following a single rule: make them immersive.

Visitors follow a narrative path, step by step, thanks to the close and extraordinary collaboration with the artists who, after visiting the Choistro del Bramante, created works specifically designed for the 17th-century building.

Highlights of the exhibition include British artist Ian Davenport's, 'Poured Staircase', and one of Lucio Fontana's famous slashed canvases.

Credit: Chiostro del Bramante
A colourful mural by Fallen Fruit / David Allen Burns and Austin YoungCredit: Chiostro del Bramante

"What we would like to happen is that the visitor somehow share their own follies with the artist's follies. Walking through these environments, through these works, also means grasping the artist's madness and somehow sharing it. And this should push the visitor to share their own madness as well," says Eccher.

The exhibition runs from 19 February 2022 to 8 January 2023.

Check out the video above to take look inside this crazy exhibition

Video editor • Theo Farrant