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'The Salesman': a masterwork of neorealism

'The Salesman': a masterwork of neorealism
By Euronews

<p>With ‘The Salesman’, Iran’s Oscar-winning director Asghar Farhadi offers once again a multi-layered <a href="http://blog.afi.com/afi-conservatory-artist-in-residence-asghar-farhadi-on-the-salesman-inspired-by-hitchcock-and-kiarostami/">masterwork of neorealism</a>. </p> <p>Emad and Rana are a happily married couple who live in Tehran. They are members of an amateur theatre group that’s putting on a production of Arthur Miller’s ‘Death Of A Salesman’. After they are forced to leave their flat which is crumbling down and <a href="http://www.euronews.com/2016/11/17/ashgar-farhadi-on-shooting-the-salesman">move into a new place</a>, Rana is the victim of a violent attack. It turns out the flat’s former occupant was a prostitute and the attacker was probably one of her clients. Emad sets out to find him.</p> <p>‘The Salesman’ is not just a drama but a meditation on the condition of women and the place of tradition in modern-day Iran. Rana decides not to go to the police – a decision clearly influenced by her and Emad’s fear of what others might think. </p> <p>A study on violence and how it can push even the wisest to seek revenge, the film also raises the universal question of forgiveness. </p> <p><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/may/21/asghar-farhadi-in-cannes-terrorists-feel-they-have-good-reason-to-be-violent">Carefully scripted to bypass censorship</a>, ‘The Salesman’ leaves a lot up to the viewer – a freedom of interpretation we hope you will enjoy as much as we did. See you soon.</p>