Article 50 author says Brexit can be reversed

The man who originally wrote article 50 has accused the British government of misleading the public as to what it really means for the country.

The British crossbench peer and author of article 50, Lord John Kerr was dismissive of Theresa May’s ‘Brexit means Brexit’ stance,

‘Actually as far as Brussels is concerned, as far as the treaty is concerned, this country still has a free choice about whether to proceed. As new facts emerge, people are entitled to take a different view and there’s nothing in article 50 to stop them. I think the British people have the right to know this and they shouldn’t be misled.’

Theresa May enacted the European legislation on March 29th in order to set the ball rolling on Brexit which is set to come into effect on the same date in 2019.

She has continued to maintain the illusion that the process was irreversible. But while negotiations falter and promises of a better future fall short, could public appetite to leave dry up completely?

A recent YouGov poll carried on the trend for the shift in national opinion against Brexit.

For the 3rd successive month YouGov Brexit tracker has “wrong to leave” in lead https://t.co/EoMSvZYGK9 pic.twitter.com/GVNu6gcAFm— Mike Smithson (@MSmithsonPB) November 10, 2017

But staunch Brexiteers continue to insist that Britain would be better off cutting ties with the EU completely, seeing the idea of a second referendum as a betrayal after getting so far down the road towards leaving the bloc.

I love this headline: "EU gives UK two weeks to spell out Brexit money." My answer: N.O.T.A.P.E.N.N.Y— Diane James (@DianeJamesMEP) November 10, 2017

Ridiculous from Gordon Brown. A Second Referendum would be a betrayal of democracy. https://t.co/vusqKHnTqK— Get Britain Out (@GetBritainOut) November 10, 2017
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