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SaloneSatellite: the unmissable appointment for young designers

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SaloneSatellite: the unmissable appointment for young designers

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Fresh and good ideas are precious gold in the right circumstances. And in the design world, when ‘young’, ‘innovative’ and ‘beautiful’ combine: trends, crazes, or even movements can happen.

SaloneSatellite is the leading global design appointment for talented young designers and a revelation of the ideas that will shape the next decades in the design industry.

The event happens inside the Salone del Mobile Milano, the biggest furniture and design event worldwide, making the SaloneSatellite a dream hub for any emerging creative, and the IT place to interact with talent scouts, manufactures and the most promising young designers.

The SaloneSatellite has been seeking out, valorising and offering concrete possibilities to designers under 35 for 21 years. This year, between 19-22 April, the event offered a 2,800 square metre hall for 650 promising talents.

The event is tailor-made for young designers to succeed. When Euronews asked Marva Griffin, head and curator of SaloneSatellite who her favourite was, she answered: "I don't have one, and if I did, I wouldn't tell you. My main concern is that all designers feel comfortable and happy."

Griffin's concern has been worth having, the SaloneSatellite is said to be the greatest acceleration initiative there is for promising and young design worldwide.

The event is a door into the future, a revelation of the shape that design will take in the forthcoming years. And a gratifying vision of a new generation that wishes to convey the perfect balance between function, beauty and sustainability.

Promising new trends

As the Salone del Mobile said in a statement, 2018’ showed no single approach, but many different, and this lack of a well-defined trend should be seen as a trend on its own. The SaloneSatellite is a great representation of this statement.

New talents seem to be fascinated by globalisation, and they pride themselves on being actors of the unification of many cultures, respecting heritage and contemporaneity, through art.

The young designers' event describes 2018’s creations as a “mix of experimentation, memory, nature and the force of matter, anthropomorphism, creative recycling, cross-pollination and digital effects, all with the power to amaze and excite.”

The SaloneStallite award selected three projects that stand out “because of the message they embody, focusing not just on the formal incisiveness of their design but also their sustainable, communicative, interactive and ludic element.”

These are the furniture objects that were valuable to the 2018 critics, they represent some of the concepts that could mould the next decades in the design industry.

Two words to describe them all? Smart design.

First Prize

Cucina Leggera (Light Kitchen)

by Stefano Carta Vasconcellos, Italy

Cucina Leggera is a kitchen unit without screws or hardware, that can be assembled interlocking only seven elements.

The award was given considering the sort of design approach that the designer used: the kind that will continue to hold good for future years to come.

"Ease of construction and assembly, compactness and financial accessibility are the main characteristics of the Light Kitchen"

Second prize

Tink Things

by Tink Things, Croatia

Tink Things are kids furniture that considers their wide spectrum of sensory needs. The designs bring a shape that is comfortable and interactive for all kids, two essential elements for children's' development.

The award recognised how Tink Things sees children as what they truly are: children. While staying true to their real necessities.

Third prize

Soft Block

by Yuri Himuro, Japan

Soft Block is a home decoration set of objects that resemble a block toy. Made of soft and bending material, the product allows the user to transform and 'finish' the shape.

Soft Block was awarded for promoting the interaction and creativity of the user, and for demonstrating the ability of fabric to become a three-dimensional and modular element.

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