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The best - and worst - gadgets unveiled at Las Vegas show

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The best - and worst - gadgets unveiled at Las Vegas show

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The best new consumer technology of 2018 is on display in Las Vegas. From self-driving vehicles to self-folding laundry, innovators have left no stone unturned in their quest for the next must-have consumer gadget.

At the technology event of the year, small start-ups and established multi-nationals rub shoulders as they showcase new products and what they hope will become the latest trends.

A few of the products to look out for:

  • Toyota's ePalette is a self-driving, electric-powered shuttle designed to transport visitors from venue to venue at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. The customisable transparent container on wheels can also be used as a mobile shop, billboard or food van.
  • The ForwardX CX-1 is a self-propelled suitcase that will follow you around and alert you if anyone tries to steal it. The hands-free carry-on bag uses a camera equipped with facial recognition artificial intelligence (AI) to lock on to its owner.
  • OneWheel - a motorised skateboard that claims to be the future of motion. The rechargeable battery can power a ride of up to 29km and the board can reach a top speed of around 30km per hour. 
  • FoldiMate laundry folder promises to take the work out of doing your washing. Just feed in your clothes and FoldiMate will smooth and fold them for you. The machine costs more than 800 euros and won't be ready to ship until late next year - so if you really hate laundry, you can start saving now.
  • LG's CLOi home robot is another gadget supposed to help you with chores by using AI to enhance the use of kitchen appliances. CLOi is designed to respond to vocal commands but at her big CES unveiling, she refused to obey. "CLOi is not going to talk to me and CLOi doesn’t like me, evidently,” US Marketing Vice President David VanderWaal said after CLOi ignored him for the third time. LG says the CLOi range is designed to deliver "both emotional interaction and innovative convenience" but it's unlikely anyone will be willing to pay for an appliance that behaves like a sulky teenager.

Twitter users made fun of the LG CLOi presentation