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Same-sex marriage: how Europe has turned pink

A timeline of how Europe has gradually legalised gay marriage.

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Same-sex marriage: how Europe has turned pink

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Austria is the latest European country to legalise same-sex marriage.

It joins a more than a dozen European Union states – and 16 across Europe – to allow gay people to tie the knot.

Here we take a look at how Europe has turned pink since the Dutch allow the practice at the start of the 21st century.

2001: The Netherlands becomes the first country in the world to legalise same-sex marriage in April of this year.

2003: Neighbours Belgium follow suit.

2005: Spanish MPs vote to approve gay marriage in June, despite strong opposition from the Roman Catholic Church.

2009: Norway becomes the first Nordic country to allow same-sex civil marriages in January. Church weddings were approved in 2016. Later in 2009, Sweden lets homosexuals marry in civil or religious ceremonies.

2010: Iceland, the first country in the world to have an openly gay head of state, approves same-sex marriage in June.

2012: Denmark, the first country in the world to recognise civil partnerships for same-sex couples in 1989, approves gay marriage 23 years later.




Mapped: how Europe has turned pink since 2001

Please note: Same-sex marriage has not been approved in Northern Ireland




2013: Gay marriage is approved in France, sparking a large protest movement.

2014: Gay marriage becomes legal in the United Kingdom, apart from Northern Ireland.

2015: Same-sex marriage becomes legal at the turn of the year in Luxembourg. Ireland then becomes the first country to approve gay marriage by popular vote.

2017: Finland votes to allow same-sex marriages, before Germany becomes the 14th country in Europe to approve same-sex marriage.

Malta and then Austria become the next countries in 2017 to approve same-sex marriage, but it won’t be lawful in the latter until 2019.