Madrid braces for Catalonia's next move

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By Keith Walker
Madrid braces for Catalonia's next move

<p>An air of anticipation hung over the Catalan parliament on Monday (October 9), a day before a planned session that could see the region declare independence from Spain.</p> <p>The national government in Madrid has made it clear it would respond immediately to such a declaration. </p> <p>Catalonia is deeply divided over the issue of secession. There are mixed feelings in the Catalan capital Barcelona.</p> <p>“We are not going back,” said one woman. “We have been fighting for this for 300 years.”</p> <p>“I think Spain should continue to be united as it is now,” said a local man. “I understand that some people want independence but I don’t agree with the way they are doing it , I think it is not correct.”</p> <p>One week after the referendum on independence which the Madrid government did its utmost to disrupt, the fraught situation has been taking its toll on some in Spain’s wealthiest region.</p> <p>Catalonia’s High Court is beefing up security to prepare for a declaration of independence. Officers from Spain’s national police service have been deployed to help out for the second weekend in a row.</p> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="ro" dir="ltr">Barcelona mayor against unilateral independence declaration or removing Catalonia’s autonomy <a href="https://t.co/DT4NKAQjnW">https://t.co/DT4NKAQjnW</a> <a href="https://t.co/irZgmXJVDE">pic.twitter.com/irZgmXJVDE</a></p>— elnacionalcat_en (@elnacionalcatEN) <a href="https://twitter.com/elnacionalcatEN/status/917442210861379584?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 9, 2017</a></blockquote><br /> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>