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Roma victims of Holocaust remembered in Bucharest

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By Seamus Kearney
Roma victims of Holocaust remembered in Bucharest

<p>Remembering the thousands of Roma people killed in World World Two concentration camps.</p> <p>An exhibition has opened in the Romanian capital, Bucharest, attended by Roma survivors and local and foreign officials. </p> <p><img src="https://static.euronews.com/articles/38/13/381361/602x312_bonus-exhib.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p>Constantin Braila, a Roma survivor of the Holocaust, said: “I went through so much, so many troubles. My mother died, my brothers, my granddad. It was so upsetting, tormenting, so sad. I was hungry, dirty, full of lice.”</p> <p>“We were near Bug River and we were able to catch fish there. They kept us there for 15 days,” he told the Associated Press. </p> <p><img src="https://static.euronews.com/articles/38/13/381361/602x312_bonus-braila.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p>“They took us somewhere near Kazarca village, where we stayed till spring. We were some one hundred families there. </p> <p>“By the time spring came and we were supposed to be taken to work, less than half of us were left. All dead. Due to hunger, lice, unwashed, without medicines.”</p> <p><img src="https://static.euronews.com/articles/38/13/381361/602x312_bonus-roma1.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p>Braila added: “Others, who were from other places and were taken to Romania, were compensated, they received houses and everything that they lost. </p> <p>“But no one gave us any compensation. Absolutely nothing. We didn’t even get a bed from the state. Or a blanket or anything else.”</p> <p>The US Ambassador to Romania, Hans Klemm, told AP: “This is very, very important. Today marks a terrible event in Romania’s history, but also for humanity. </p> <p>“It’s very important that we not forget what happened during the holocaust here in Europe, here in Romania.”</p> <p><img src="https://static.euronews.com/articles/38/13/381361/602x312_bonus-roma2.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p>Some 3,000 Roma were taken to gas chambers at Auschwitz and exterminated in 1944.</p> <p>Fifty-thousand Roma were also deported to Trans-Dniester in the Soviet Union and 11,000 died, according to the Elie Wiesel Institute for the Study of the Holocaust in Romania. </p> <p><iframe width="602" height="312" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MC-epqtdEkY?ecver=1" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Romania has an estimated 1.85 million Roma, many of whom are poor and complain of prejudice.</p> <p>It is difficult getting exact figures on Roma populations.</p> <p>The Council of Europe’s Roma and Travellers Division has published a list of Roma populations, using some minimum and maximum estimates, and has established a list of “average estimates”. </p> <p>According to that list, these are the 10 countries in Europe with the highest Roma populations: Turkey (2.75 million); Romania (1.85 million); Russia (825,000); Bulgaria (750,000); Spain (725,000); Hungary (700,000); Serbia (600,000); Slovakia (500,000); France (400,000); and Greece (265,000).</p> <p>Find out more about the Roma people in Europe by reading this article: <a href="http://bit.ly/2umIV6A">Who are the Roma People?</a></p> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Exhibition on Roma Holocaust victims has opened in Bucharest. But it’s a common mistake to say Roma are from Romania <a href="https://t.co/U79atu50DP">https://t.co/U79atu50DP</a></p>— Seamus Kearney (@seamuskearney_) <a href="https://twitter.com/seamuskearney_/status/893023316843343873">August 3, 2017</a></blockquote><br /> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p>