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Macron magic: French president's party poised for landslide

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By Euronews
Macron magic: French president's party poised for landslide

<p>Emmanuel Macron has done it again.</p> <p>After he won the presidency last month, now his party is making the headlines with success in France’s parliamentary elections and a landslide win in perspective.</p> <p>The 39-year-old ex-banker only created his ‘Republic on the Move’ party just over a year ago. </p> <p>With fellow centrist allies Modem, it has won over 32 percent in Sunday’s first-round vote, delivering a crushing blow to the established parties on the right and left.</p> <p><br /> </p> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="fr"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Hold on, it wasn’t meant to be this easy for Emmanuel Macron <a href="https://t.co/XhtR8aHqgS">https://t.co/XhtR8aHqgS</a> <a href="https://t.co/Jrowf9En1f">pic.twitter.com/Jrowf9En1f</a></p>— The Local France (@TheLocalFrance) <a href="https://twitter.com/TheLocalFrance/status/873979711126355968">11 juin 2017</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p> <p><br /> </p> <p>However fewer than half of the 47 million voters turned out in the first round – the lowest level by far in a legislative election in France’s 60-year-old fifth Republic.</p> <p>Macron’s opponents and some members of the wider public see that as a danger to democracy.</p> <p>“It is troublesome because there is a lack of opposition. For sure, that leaves the door wide open and gives a big key to Mr Macron. It is a bit of a shame,” said Christophe Tricart, 55, in Paris.</p> <p>“There is a problem of legitimacy when more than 50 percent of voters haven’t turned out, not to mention those with spoiled ballot papers,” said Frederic Maynier, another passer-by in the French capital.</p> <p>Macron’s candidates, many of them political novices, and their allies could win up to three quarters of seats in the National Assembly, in next Sunday’s decisive second round of voting.</p> <p>That would be France’s biggest majority in decades, and effectively leaves only the powerful trade union movement as a potential obstacle to the pro-business reforms Macron has promised to introduce in a bid to boost growth and jobs.</p> <p><br /> </p> <p><em>with Reuters</em></p>