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3,000-year-old judge discovered in Egypt

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By Atack Patrick
3,000-year-old judge discovered in Egypt

<p>Egyptian archaeologists have uncovered a tomb near an ancient court room, estimated to be over 3,000 years old. </p> <p>The find was made near the Nile city Luxor, in the east of the country. The archaeologists says the remains found in the Dra Abu-el Naga necropolis belong to Userhat, a judge who lived during the New Kingdom era. </p> <p>The tomb has been discovered close to the Valley of the Kings, which was made famous with the 1917 discovery of King Tutankhamun and subsequent rumours of a ‘curse’ on those who disturb the tombs of pharaohs and important members of ancient Egyptian society. </p> <p>No such curses or rumours of suspicious inscriptions have been reported on Userhat’s tomb. </p> <p>The Egyptian Ministry for Antiquities said the tomb is a typical example of that of a “nobleman”, and consists of an “open court leading into a rectangular hall, a corridor and an inner chamber”. </p> <a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/euronews/albums/72157679502040304" title="3,000-year-old judge discovered in Egypt"><img src="https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2936/33291602814_24b4b1eeb5_z.jpg" width="640" height="402" alt="3,000-year-old judge discovered in Egypt"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <p>Along with the well preserved wooden coffin, the archaeological team uncovered several Ushabti, or funeral figurines, and wooden masks. </p> <p>The burial room itself is located at the bottom of a nine metre deep shaft. Another room was uncovered at the bottom of this shaft, which archaeologists are continuing to work on and excavate the treasures and tombs it holds. </p> <p><strong>Third find in 2017</strong> </p> <p>This may be a major discovery, but it is not the only such find this year. </p> <p>In fact, it’s the third large scale discovery of ancient artefacts in 2017. </p> <p>In January, a team from the Swedish Lund University uncovered at least 12 burial sites near Aswan, in the south of the country. </p> <p>Like the discovery near Luxor, these tombs are thought to date back to the New Kingdom era. </p> <p>But these were not kings or pharaohs. <a href="http://www.reuters.com/article/us-egypt-archaeology-idUSKBN14V1CQ">Head of the team</a>, Maria Nilsson, said several bodies seemed to show evidence of malnutrition and even broken bones from years of hard labour. </p> <p>And as recently as <a href="http://www.euronews.com/2017/03/17/ancient-egyptian-statue-not-ramses-ii-but-psamtek-i">March 2017</a>, a giant statue of King Psamtek I (not Pharaoh Ramses II as first thought) was unearthed in a Cairo suburb. </p> <p>An Egyptian-German team found the eight-metre statue submerged in water, and say it is proof of a huge temple that once stood on the same ground. The gates of the temple, located in the ancient capital of Heliopolis, are said to have stood at least 15-metres high.</p> <p><strong>Ancient cure to a modern problem?</strong> </p> <p>Egyptian tourism has been in a slump since the 2011 uprising to overthrow President Hosni Mubarak. And with <span class="caps">ISIL</span> claiming responsibility for bombs <a href="http://www.euronews.com/2017/04/09/egypt-dozens-dead-as-isil-attacks-coptic-christians">targeting Egypt’s ancient Coptic Christian</a> community, tourists have been put off visiting even further. </p> <p>But the Tourism Development Agency are hopeful that these discoveries, and more like them, will encourage tourists to return. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Tomb wall reliefs depict gifts and offerings which would have been presented to Userhat and his wife, Mutnefret, in the afterlife <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/history?src=hash">#history</a> <a href="https://t.co/4Q0i1pj1ZV">pic.twitter.com/4Q0i1pj1ZV</a></p>— GroovyHistorian (@GroovyHistorian) <a href="https://twitter.com/GroovyHistorian/status/854301707697782784">April 18, 2017</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <p>The head of that department, Hisham El Demery, said “these discoveries are positive news from Egypt’s tourism industry, which is something we all really need”.</p> <iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fpermalink.php%3Fstory_fbid%3D1390542274324752%26id%3D172009302844728&width=500" width="500" height="708" style="border:none;overflow:hidden" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowTransparency="true"></iframe>