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Life beyond earth? Try Saturn's moon Enceladus

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By Euronews
Life beyond earth? Try Saturn's moon Enceladus

<p>Is there life on Enceladus?</p> <p>That is the question <span class="caps">NASA</span> scientists are asking after an amazing discovery on Enceladus, a moon of the planet Saturn.</p> <p>Ice plumes shooting into space from the ocean-bearing moon contain hydrogen from hydrothermal vents, an environment that some scientists believe led to the rise of life on Earth.</p> <p>The discovery makes Enceladus the only place beyond Earth where scientists have found direct evidence of a possible energy source for life, according to the findings in the journal Science.</p> <br /> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="fr"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Want to learn more about today's announcement of molecular hydrogen on Enceladus? Read the research: <a href="https://t.co/WjrELivRaV">https://t.co/WjrELivRaV</a> <a href="https://t.co/InJnRq3uuk">pic.twitter.com/InJnRq3uuk</a></p>— Science Magazine (@sciencemagazine) <a href="https://twitter.com/sciencemagazine/status/852608407030964228">13 avril 2017</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p> <br /> <p><span class="caps">NASA</span>’s Cassini spacecraft is to thank for the revelation. In September, Cassini will end a 13-year mission exploring Saturn and its entourage of 62 known moons.</p> <br /> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="fr"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">NASA's Cassini spacecraft is preparing for its final -- and fatal -- dive towards Saturn: <a href="https://t.co/PIo2YcOrUW">https://t.co/PIo2YcOrUW</a></p>— News from Science (@NewsfromScience) <a href="https://twitter.com/NewsfromScience/status/852597005406748672">13 avril 2017</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p> <br /> <p>“We now know that Enceladus has almost all of the ingredients that you would need to support life as we know it on Earth,” said Cassini Mission Project Scientist Linda Spilker,</p> <p>Her associate on the project, Chris Glein, said no evidence had yet been found of organisms on Enceladus.</p> <p>But he added: “I am encouraged by the geochemical data which could allow for this possibility”.</p> <p>Several moons orbiting Saturn and Jupiter are known to contain underground oceans, but Enceladus is the only one where scientists have found proof of an energy source for life.</p> <p><em>with Reuters</em></p>