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Judge rules doctors can withdraw baby's life support - against parents' wishes

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By Euronews
Judge rules doctors can withdraw baby's life support - against parents' wishes

<p>A High Court judge has given doctors in the UK permission to withdraw the life support of a baby boy – against the wishes of his parents. </p> <p>Connie Yates and Chris Gard, from London, want to take their eight-month-old son Charlie, who suffers from a rare genetic condition, to America for experimental treatment.</p> <p>But his doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London said he has irreversible brain damage and asked the courts for permission to begin palliative care.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Read full summary of judge's ruling over baby Charlie Gard's life support<a href="https://t.co/lFbeRPpWt8">https://t.co/lFbeRPpWt8</a> <a href="https://t.co/sFIFACLOze">pic.twitter.com/sFIFACLOze</a></p>— Daily Mirror (@DailyMirror) <a href="https://twitter.com/DailyMirror/status/851817058559983620">April 11, 2017</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <p><a href="https://www.judiciary.gov.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/gard-press-summary-20170411.pdf">Mr Justice Francis ruled</a>: “It is with the heaviest of hearts, but with complete conviction for Charlie’s best interests, that I find it is in Charlie’s best interests that I accede to these applications and rule that <span class="caps">GOSH</span> may lawfully withdraw all treatment save for palliative care to permit Charlie to die with dignity.”</p> <p>Charlie, who was born on 4 August, has a disorder called mitochondrial depletion syndrome, and is unable to move, is fed through a tube and breathes through a machine. </p> <p>The doctor behind the experimental nucleoside therapy in America accepted that it was “very unlikely” that Charlie’s condition would improve with the treatment.</p> <p>He said she was still willing to carry out the treatment if the parents could afford it.</p> <p>Justice Francis said: “Understandably, Charlie’s parents have grasped that possibility, they have done all that they could possibly have done, they have very publicly raised funds. </p> <p>“What parents would not do the same?”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Baby Charlie's parents weep in court as judge rules his life-support <span class="caps">CAN</span> be turned off <a href="https://t.co/RXAbeLXNij">https://t.co/RXAbeLXNij</a> <a href="https://t.co/xqNmIQpdvl">pic.twitter.com/xqNmIQpdvl</a></p>— Daily Express (@Daily_Express) <a href="https://twitter.com/Daily_Express/status/851824746023063553">April 11, 2017</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script> <p>However, the Judge concluded that there is “unamitiy among doctors” that the treatment would not reverse the brain damage, and could cause Charlie pain.</p> <p>Judge Francis added: “I dare say that medical science may benefit, objectively, from the experiment, but experimentation cannot be in Charlie’s best interests unless there is a prospect of benefit for him.”</p> <p>Charlie’s parents had raised over one million euros to pay for his treatment, as part of a campaign called <a href="http://www.charliesfight.org/">Charlie’s Fight</a></p> <p>They have up to three weeks to decide if they want to appeal the decision.</p>