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King of Spain dissolves parliament

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By Catherine Hardy  with APTN
King of Spain dissolves parliament

<p><p></p> <ul> <li>King of Spain dissolves parliament</li> <li>New election called for June 26</li> <li>Talk is already of alliances</li> <li>High rate of abstention predicted</li> </ul> </p> <p>The King of Spain has dissolved parliament and called a parliamentary election for June 26.</p> <p>It is the first time the country has re-run an election. </p> <p>It has been in a political stalemate since the previous vote last December. <p></p> <p>“This is the first time since we became a democracy that the parliament has been dissolved because we have not been able to reach an agreement of the majority necessary to form a government. I hope the last four months have helped us learn a few things,” said the <strong>President of the Spanish Parliament, Patxi Lopez</strong>.</p> </p> <h3><strong>What happened in December?</strong></h3> <p> <p>The new ballot follows four months of fruitless coalition talks between Spain’s four main parties in the wake of the last election.</p> <p>The conservative People’s Party (PP) of acting prime minister Mariano Rajoy won the most votes but lost its majority.</p> <p>The election marked the end of the dominance of the two traditional parties, the PP and the Socialists.</p> <p>Their power base was eroded by the anti-austerity newcomers Podemos, who may team up with the far-left Izqueirda Unida.</p> <p>The centrist Ciudadanos may hold the balance of power.</p> </p> <h3><strong>Will it be different this time?</strong></h3> <p> <p>It is not clear.</p> <p>Polls suggest the re-run may also end in stalemate. </p> <p>There are also predictions of a rise in abstentions. Experts say this could play in the favour of the traditional parties like the PP and Socialists.</p> </p>