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End of the road: Volkswagen CEO Winterkorn quits over emissions scandal

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By Euronews
End of the road: Volkswagen CEO Winterkorn quits over emissions scandal

<p>Volkswagen Chief Executive Martin Winterkorn resigned on Wednesday amid a spiralling scandal over the German carmaker’s rigging of diesel car emissions tests in the United States.</p> <p>“Volkswagen needs a fresh start – also in terms of personnel. I am clearing the way for this fresh start with my resignation,” Winterkorn, 68, said in a statement. </p> <p>He said he was shocked by events of the past few days, above all that misconduct on such a massive scale was possible at the company.</p> <p><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="fr"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Everything to know about Volkswagen’s outgoing CEO <a href="http://t.co/wPMJHSa1b9">http://t.co/wPMJHSa1b9</a> <a href="http://t.co/A12wAia5Hy">pic.twitter.com/A12wAia5Hy</a></p>— TIME.com (@TIME) <a href="https://twitter.com/TIME/status/646709124286300160">23 Septembre 2015</a></blockquote> <script async src="//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p> <p>Volkswagen’s supervisory board faced the press following news of <br /> the <span class="caps">CEO</span>’s resignation. A decision about Winterkorn’s successor will be made on Friday.</p> <p>Supervisory Board Chairman Berthold Huber said: “We’d like to clearly state that Mr Winterkorn was not aware of the manipulation of emissions and that we have the greatest respect for his willingness to send a very clear signal and take responsibility in this difficult situation for Volkswagen.”</p> <p>The board says it expects more heads to roll in the coming days as <br /> an internal investigation seeks to identify who was responsible for <br /> the biggest scandal in Volkswagen’s 78-year history.</p> <p>The firm was under huge pressure to take decisive action, with its shares badly hit since the crisis broke, and the bad news still coming.</p> <p>Growing questions are being asked in Europe about whether Volkswagen falsified tests there.</p> <p>French Energy Minister Ségolène Royal says Paris will be ‘extremely severe’ if its investigation uncovers any wrongdoing.</p> <p>For Royal, the victims would be “workers put in a more precarious position, duped consumers and the French state which pays subsidies for the purchase of environmentally-friendly cars.”</p> <p>With German prosecutors also looking closely at the situation, and reports of a criminal probe by the US Justice Department, Volkswagen has set aside 6.5 billion euros to cover the costs of this crisis.</p> <p>Analysts doubt that will be enough, with the firm admitting the scandal could affect 11 million of its cars around the globe.</p>