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Sarajevo's vibrant youth probe past, present

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By Euronews
Sarajevo's vibrant youth probe past, present

<p>Two decades after the end of the Bosnian War, the children of Sarajevo educate themselves in its history. They have created university exchange programmes, youth clubs, non-governmental organisations and a museum of war childhood.</p> <p>The Incubator for Social Innovations “Munja” is associated with the Youth Information Agency.</p> <p>Among Munja’s leading participants, Zlatan Kulenovic said: “Our position of social innovation incubator is how to awake, how to inspire, how to motivate, how to show to use what exists, what are your opportunities.” </p> <p>There is a determined drive to share knowledge.</p> <p>In Sacha Januvo’s opinion: “Human rights are being trampled every day on different levels. I think that a lot of people, not just in Bosnia but in general, aren’t aware of all their rights, and I don’t think they really have the will to explore what their rights are.”</p> <p>Young activists from other countries in crisis today are also invited to Sarajevo. They find immediate recognition from those who were old enough during the 1992-1995 siege of the city. </p> <p>The founder of the childhood war museum has also compiled a book of children’s memories, called ‘Childhood in War’, rich in illustration and reflection.</p> <p>Chronicler Jasminko Halilovic said: “Almost 1,000 people answered my call to take part in creating the book — living in 35 countries. In the end, I created a mosaic of these brief memories, different points of view that represent growing up during a war.”</p> <p>An excerpt from the book: “It’s cold, bullets whistling outside. No one goes into the basement any more, no matter what. I’d really like an apple.”</p> <p>Some 10,000 civilians were killed in the 44-month Siege of Sarajevo; 1,500 were children.</p>