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Nepal earthquake: aid offers pour in as death toll climbs by the minute

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Nepal earthquake: aid offers pour in as death toll climbs by the minute



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In Kathmandu, residents bedded down for the night in make-shift outdoor shelters after a devastating earthquake rocked Nepal on Saturday.

Afraid to return home, people preferred to brave the freezing temperatures.

“We are hearing rumours that other bigger earthquakes are expected to happen. We are sleeping here, so we can stay safe and quickly run to safety if needed,” explained Rabindra Shresth, a local resident displaced by the earthquake.

One new tremor felt in Nepal and India had a magnitude of 6.7, according to the US Geological Survey.

A new avalanche has also been triggered near Mount Everest.

The death toll climbs with every passing hour since the 7.9 magnitude quake struck, and it currently stands at more than 2,000.

An untold number of people have been injured.

With many people still trapped under rubble, there are fears the death toll will climb.

The quake also triggered an avalanche on Mount Everest, killing at least 18 people as it swept through a base camp for climbers.

Thirty-six fatalities were reported in India, which is now coordinating a disaster response to help neighbouring Nepal.

India’s Foreign Minister, Subrahmanyam Jaishankar, said: “Once we have a damage assessment, which we hope to have done overnight, by tomorrow our endeavour would be to have five helicopters positioned in Kathmandu and five helicopters positioned in Pokhara.

“Their role would be to do the local rescue, to do airlifting if they have to and to do food distribution locally.”

The US is providing one million dollars in immediate assistance to Nepal, and China is also sending an emergency team.

International aid groups are rushing to reach victims in rural villages after communications were cut off by the quake.

Google has launched a People Finder search for those looking to check on loved ones.

The historic Dharahara Tower in Nepal’s capital has been reduced to a stump. Built in 1832, what was a 14-storey structure is now unrecognisable.

Nepal’s worst earthquake in 1934 killed more than 8,500 people.


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