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World Cup enthusiasm means winning year for Adidas


World Cup enthusiasm means winning year for Adidas


Balls, boots and strip are selling fast enough for German sportswear firm Adidas to predict it will meet its goal of two billion euros worth of football related sales this year.

It expects to sell more than eight million jerseys of the nine national sides it is sponsoring at the contest, along with more than 14 million replicas of the ‘Brazuca’ official World Cup match ball.

Adidas has been facing a strong challenge from Nike, the world’s biggest sportswear company, which has only been a serious player in football for the last 20 years.

Chief Executive Herbert Hainer said Adidas would reach its target of two billion euros ($2.72 billion) of football sales in 2014, keeping it ahead of Nike’s estimated $2 billion in soccer turnover.

“We as a brand have by far scored the most goals,” Hainer told a news conference, highlighting the World Cup performance of players wearing Adidas boots like Robin van Persie and Arjen Robben of the Netherlands and Thomas Mueller of Germany.

Hainer said about 80-90 percent of the Adidas World Cup jerseys had already been sold when the competition started.

“Whatever happens through the tournament, this is the icing on the cake,” he said. “If Germany wins, we still can sell a few more but this will not materially change our results.”

He said it was too early to give a forecast for football sales in 2015, but predicted the World Cup would have a lasting impact, particularly on sales in Latin America: “It will be another great year for us in football.”

Adidas, the world’s second-biggest sportswear company, has been losing market share in western Europe, its home territory, to Nike, which is also challenging its dominance in football.

While Adidas has supplied the match ball for the World Cup since 1970 and has extended its sponsorship of the competition to 2030, Nike is for the first time kitting out more teams – 10 out of 32 finalists – including hosts and favourites Brazil.

with Reuters

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