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Is this the world's first 'stroke selfie'?

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By Chris Harris
Is this the world's first 'stroke selfie'?

<p>Doctors have praised a Canadian woman who took a video of herself having a mini-stroke.</p> <p>Stacey Yepes, from Ontario, was driving when she began feeling unwell.</p> <p>The 49-year-old pulled over and recorded her symptoms – a move which helped doctors diagnose her.</p> <p>Two days earlier, in April, she had felt numbness in her face and had trouble speaking. But stroke tests were negative and doctors put it down to stress.</p> <p>“It’s true that I hadn’t slept well the last few days and that I have a stressful job,” said Yepes, who works as a legal secretary. “But I was pretty sure that the symptoms I had experienced were due to a stroke.”</p> <p>When the symptoms returned while she was at the wheel, she decided to take the unusual move of taking a ‘stroke selfie’.</p> <p>“My tongue feels very numb,” she says in the recording. </p> <p>“I don’t why this is happening to me,” she adds. “My hand is hard to lift up and touch something like my nose.”</p> <p>Yepes then took the video to doctors for a second opinion. The recording was enough to diagnose that she had suffered a transient ischemic attack, more commonly referred to as a mini-stroke. She was admitted to a specialist stroke centre.</p> <p>“In all my years treating stroke patients, we’ve never seen anyone tape themselves before,” said Dr Cheryl Jaigobin, stroke neurologist at the Toronto Western Hospital’s Krembil Neuroscience Centre, <a href="http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/stroke-diagnosis-made-through-woman-s-selfie-video-1.2677550" rel="external">told CBC</a>. “Her symptoms were compelling, and the fact she stopped and found a way to portray them in such a visual fashion, we were all touched by it.”</p> <p>Mini-strokes are caused by blood clots and only differ from a full-blown episode in that they are temporary, according to Toronto’s University Health Network. They are sign that a full-blown stroke could happen.</p> <p>Britain’s Stroke Association says facial or arm weakness and speech problems <a href="http://www.stroke.org.uk/about/recognise-symptoms" rel="external"> are signs someone is having a stroke</a>.</p>