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Georgia's school report: on the right path, more effort needed

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Georgia's school report: on the right path, more effort needed

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Since becoming independent from the Soviet Union, Georgia has made sweeping social reforms, including a number in education.

However, pre-school attendance, the integration of ethnic minorities and unemployment are still problems to be solved.

In this special edition of Learning World Maha Barada takes an in-depth look at those issues and the efforts being made to deal with them in Georgia.

Her first report delves into long-standing concerns over pre-school education. Outdated, Soviet-style nurseries are gradually being replaced by friendly, child-centred establishments. But the process is slow and many pre-school kids still miss out on a solid start to their education.

Our second report looks at the challenges of providing education to a population that speaks various languages.

The official language Georgian and for many years Russian has been the first foreign language taught in schools. But recently there has been a shift to English. But what does that mean for Georgians who do not speak any of these languages at home?

We take things to the third level in our third report with a look at higher education in Georgia. In the capital, the Tbilisi State University is long-established, prestigious and ambitious. But in common with students in many other parts of the world, graduates are finding it hard to break into the job market. Experts say this is in part because universities are simply not providing an education that is relevant to today’s jobs market.

The Learning World team is very keen to have your feedback, so don’t hesitate to drop us a line on our social media pages about any unusual education ideas or initiatives you may have come across in the world of education.

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