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Being gay is in a man's genes, says study

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By Euronews
Being gay is in a man's genes, says study

<p>Fresh evidence has emerged to back up the idea male sexual orientation is influenced by genes.</p> <p>Researchers looked at the <span class="caps">DNA</span> of 400 gay men and found two chromosomes that appear to be linked to homosexuality.</p> <p>But it is not known which of the chromosomes’ genes are the important ones and how they affect sexual orientation.</p> <p>The work, unveiled at the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s annual meeting, backs up a controversial 1993 study. That research, by Dean Hamer, concluded homosexuality tended to be inherited.</p> <p>Michael Bailey, a psychologist at Northwestern University in Illinois, said: “Sexual orientation has nothing to do with choice. Our findings suggest there may be genes at play – we found evidence for two sets that affect whether a man is gay or straight.</p> <p>“But it is not completely determinative; there are certainly other environmental factors involved. The study shows that there are genes involved in male sexual orientation.</p> <p>“Although this could one day lead to a pre-natal test for male sexual orientation, it would not be very accurate, as there are other factors that can influence the outcome.”</p> <p>Qazi Rahman, a psychologist at King’s College London, told the Guardian: “This is not controversial or surprising and is nothing people should worry about. All human psychological traits are heritable, that is, they have a genetic component,” he said. “Genetic factors explain 30 to 40% of the variation between people’s sexual orientation. </p> <p>“However, we don’t know where these genetic factors are located in the genome. So we need to do ‘gene finding’ studies, like this one by Sanders, Bailey and others, to have a better idea where potential genes for sexual orientation may lie.”</p>