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Syrian activists accuse Assad forces of nerve gas attack

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Syrian activists accuse Assad forces of nerve gas attack


Syrian activists say as many as 650 people have killed in nerve gas attacks launched by government forces near Damascus.

The alleged toxic assaults took place at positions held by anti-government rebels on the outskirts of the Syrian capital. On Wednesday several videos were posted on the internet showing dozens of lifeless bodies, many of whom are children, lying on the floor of a clinic. The footage, taken by known activists, was taken on Wednesday in the Eastern Ghouta area of Damascus. The bodies do not show any signs of injury. Due to the very graphic and disturbing nature of the images, euronews will not embed the videos but has provided links at the bottom of this article.

The reports, which could not be independently verified, have been strenuously denied by Syrian government officials. “The leadership of the army confirms these allegations are completely false and are part of the dirty media war that is led by countries that oppose Syria,” said an unnamed military spokesperson.

Both sides in the conflict have accused one another of using chemical weapons in a war that has claimed the lives of an estimated 100,000 people and which shows no signs of abating.

As the latest accusations surface, a UN team is in Damascus to probe previous allegations of chemical weapon use.

The Arab League, Britain and France have called on the inspectors to be granted immediate access to the alleged attack sites. Russia has also called for a full investigation and has suggested that the attack could have been launched by opponents of the Syrian regime themselves, in order to provoke international action.


- A clinic in the Eastern Ghouta area of Damascus.
- The Kafr Batna Coordination Committee identifies the first group of bodies shown on camera as a family.
- Video was uploaded from the account of Erbeen-based media activists Coordinating Erbeen.

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