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Hot work as a journalist at the Paris Air Show


Hot work as a journalist at the Paris Air Show

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There are over 3,000 accredited journalists at Le Bourget.

Their work is not easy. First, because the events, announcements of new contracts, and press conferences are so numerous as to force continuous and often difficult choices. Follow the commercial announcement of Airbus or Boeing? Will news of the technological advances in the military industry come out of this briefing, or not?

Then, once you have found the right story, you have to write it or edit the reports for radio or TV. Easier said than done: the press room is almost always full and finding a place is a challenge – and this year there was no air conditioning.

Many journalists prefer to work in the chalet of a big exhibitor (traditionally those of Airbus, Boeing, Finmeccanica and Thales are the most sought after). With our cameraman Bastien, we chose the terrace of the organisation’s official press room – where there is at least a little air circulating – but we are forced to work with the roar of the planes from the air display in the background. Noisy, but it creates a good atmosphere.

At the end of each day, we send our reports via the Internet. There was a moment of panic during the first day of the show when a storm cut the speed of the network (even satellites had problems because of the dense cloud cover). Luckily, the exhibition’s technical organisation (Gifas) soon resolved the issue and the Internet service is now, without doubt, better than the service found at other air shows around the world.

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