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It may have been a cold and rainy London outside but everyone soon warmed up inside as awards began to flow at this year’s Bafta ceremony.

Ben Affleck topped the night’s score with two gongs, one for best picture and another for best director, both for his film Argo.

It is a tale about the rescue of American hostages in Iran during the 1979 revolution and Sunday night’s recognition makes it favourite to take the Oscar in two weeks time.

The reclusive Daniel Day-Lewis turned out to scoop up best actor for his widely acclaimed performance in the title role of Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln.

Known for staying in character during the entire filming period, Day-Lewis joked about his own acting methods telling the audience: “Just on the chance that I might one day have to speak on an evening such as this, I’ve actually stayed in character as myself for the last 55 years.”

Eighty-five-year-old Emmanuelle Riva, won best actress for her role as a retired music teacher struggling to cope with the aftermath of a stroke in the French-language film Amour.

Anne Hathaway won the Bafta for best supporting actress for her singing role as the tragic Fantine in Les Miserables, the film version of the stage musical.

And finally Bond got a Bafta, the first recognition for 007 in 50 years. Skyfall, which was the most successful film in UK box office history, beat the bookies favourite Les Miserables to win the award for outstanding British film.

Versatile British director Alan Parker, whose body of work ranges from musical gangster film Bugsy Malone to Turkish-set prison thriller Midnight Express and civil rights drama Mississippi Burning, received a BAFTA fellowship.

Copyright © 2014 euronews

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