Close
Log in
Please enter your login details

Skip to main content

Breaking News
  • The United Nations Human Rights Committee calls on China to ensure universal suffrage in Hong Kong
  • Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper will toughen his country’s terror laws after the attack at the Canadian Parliament

One person has been killed in Cairo in a fifth day of protests directed at Egypt’s president Mohamed Morsi.

The president is being criticised by Egypt’s main opposition coalition – the National Salvation Front coalition (FSN) – for declaring a state of emergency in three cities along the Suez Canal

The FSN has also rebuffed Morsi’s invitation for talks.

The president’s opponents accuse him of only listening to his Islamist allies, while Morsi says they are trying to overthrow Egypt’s first freely elected leader.

One protester in Cairo was convinced Morsi is not in charge of the country. “The Supreme guide of the Muslim Brotherhood is the one who actually makes all the decisions,” he said.

At least 50 people have lost their lives in this latest outbreak of violence. The president has taken a tough stance, saying “force and firmness” will be used to restore order.

In a televised speech, Morsi said he had read the constitution before deciding to declare the state of emergency for thirty days in the three provinces of Port Said, Suez and Ismailia.

All three will also have nightly curfews starting on Monday from 21:00 to 06:00 local time, according to the President

Port Said has seen the worst of the clashes since the weekend with more than 30 deaths.

The unrest has been exacerbated by death sentences given to 21 people involved in Egypt’s worst incidence of violence at a football match, in which 74 people died at Port Said stadium last February.

After a match between local side al-Masry and Cairo’s al-Ahly, Al-Masry fans invaded the pitch, throwing stones and fireworks. Spectators were trampled to death as panicked crowds tried to flee the stadium.

Copyright © 2014 euronews

More about: