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Them bones, them bones
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Swedish scientists have developed a glue that can act as a plaster for complicated bone fractures, which could dramatically improve patient recovery time. Researchers at Stockholm’s Royal Institute of Technology believe it will eliminate the need for metal pins and screws, resulting in faster, safer and less complex surgery:

Hans Von Holst, is Professor of Neuroengineering at the Royal Institute of Technology:

“When we use glue there will be no need for general anaesthesia . Instead we will use local anaesthesia. This means that the operation will be shorter with fewer complications for older people.”

The research team say many elderly patients struggle with general anaesthesia, scientists are convinced the glue will eradicate the problem.After the fractured bone has healed the glue will degrade and be absorbed by the body, leaving no traces behind of the operation.

Hans Von Holst, is Professor of Neuroengineering at Royal Institute of Technology :

“At the moment an adult that receives this sort of treatment has to be away from work for about three months and stays in hospital for about one week. With the new glue we expect patients to leave hospital the same evening or the next day and go back to work after two or three days off.”

But, there are still questions of safety to address and scientists are looking at toxicology reports to ensure the substance is not harmful. If the glue passes the test researchers will begin animal trials confident operations using the glue could begin some time this year.

Copyright © 2014 euronews

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