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As reports of the murder of three Kurdish women in Paris became public, protesters took to the streets of the southeastern city of Diyarbakir, home to one of the largest Kurdish communities in Turkey.

Turkey’s pro-Kurdish opposition party believe the killings are connected to the recently announced peace moves.

Sirri Sakik, an MP for the pro-Kurdish Peace and Democracy Party, said: “We call on the French government to find those who carried out the killings and inform the public. We are going through an important period in the quest for peace. When we look at the past, we see that whenever such peace talks are underway, such attacks, such acts of provocation have always taken place.”

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, who was on a visit to Senegal, said Turkey is working towards an end to seperatist violence and that efforts are genuine.

“It could be an internal feud. In the meantime we are still fighting against terrorism. We want progress in our struggle. But there are people who don’t like progress. These people may be behind the deaths,” said the prime minister.

A battle for hearts and minds within the PKK is the theory that is gaining momentum in Turkey.

Atilla Sandıklı, the head of the Bilgesam Strategic Research Centre, said: “The PKK has transformed into a profit making organisation and terrorist group at the same time. That means they liquidate people. If there is a group of people who disagree or don’t comply with the leadership they are removed.”

Euronews Istanbul correspondent Bora Bayraktiar said: “People in Turkey have seen many such peace talks and remain cautious. They watch from a distance and await the outcome.”

Copyright © 2014 euronews

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