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No end in sight

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No end in sight


Did you miss it, or were you there? Those are weighty questions which will go down in history as generations remember December 21 and the end of the world.

They gathered in ancient sites throughout Europe to mark – or perhaps celebrate – doomsday. One focus was Bugarach in France, a tiny hamlet which was predicted would be spared the Apocalypse.

There was talk that aliens would be involved here which was a magnet for journalists.

“We came here to have some fun, to give you journalists something to cover because we noticed you were getting bored. As the aliens didn’t show up we thought we would come and pay you a visit,” said one of the visitors.

The mystic myth – well that is if you don’t believe – drew hundreds to the village of Sirince in Turkey. It was predicted the end would come as Noah’s Ark returned to a hill in the hamlet. No Noah, no vessel, but the tourists gathered two by two.

“It all happened as we expected. We came here out of curiosity. We came to see what people would do. It was a nice atmosphere and now we will return home,” explained one tourist.

At England’s ancient Stonehenge monument such events are old hat. There it was a double celebration. December 21 also marks the winter solstice.

Thousands converged on the prehistoric ring of stones to spend the night preparing for the end, dancing until dawn – which defied prophecy and the Mayan calendar – breaking once again in the eastern sky.

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