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Norwegian anger and sadness following Breivik verdict

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Norwegian anger and sadness following Breivik verdict


In Norway, many survivors of Anders Behring Breivik’s mass killings are still coming to terms with the tragedy, more than 12 months on.

Seventy-seven people were killed in twin attacks on Oslo and Utoeya island last July.

On Friday, the 33-year-old was found to be sane and jailed for a maximum of 21 years by a court in Oslo. But many victims’ relatives and survivors avoided the media coverage of the trial.

Per Anders Langerod escaped the mass shooting on Utoeya island and is still extremely angry.

“I want to visit him in his jail cell and yell at him for like 15 minutes, be really angry. Yeah, yell at him really hard for 15 minutes, 20 minutes, show anger,” said Langerod.

Some Norwegians were unsurprised by Breivik’s continued defiance, as he gave a far-right salute as he entered the courtroom for the verdict.

“We have become used to his reactions. I don’t think people will think too much about that. We wanted this verdict and it will give us an opportunity now to sort of get rid of him for a while and have him behind bars,” said Oslo resident Beate Amundsen Korren.

The world’s media have begun to pack up after being camped outside the courtroom for the past three months. For them the story is over now that Breivik has received a 21-year maximum term.

But some victims’ relatives do not believe their nightmare will ever end, including Unni Marcussen, whose 16-year-old daughter Andrina was shot dead by Breivik.

“I cannot put Andrina behind me. She is still with us. I can try to forget the trial of the man who killed my daughter behind me. But the sadness continues and the longing for my daughter is still there. That is something we are learning to live with,” she said.

Some Norwegians are calling for tougher penalties for such awful crimes, with one newspaper declaring that 21 years for 77 victims is just not enough.

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