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Why France's far right is thrilled


France

Why France's far right is thrilled

Marine Le Pen has accomplished her mission not only to lead France’s Front National or National Front but to wave what detractors call its extremist ideas over the country’s political landscape. What is more, she did it within a year
Why France’s far right is thrilled

Marine Le Pen has accomplished her mission not only to lead France’s Front National or National Front but to wave what detractors call its extremist ideas over the country’s political landscape. What is more, she did it within a year of becoming the party’s leader.

The news that nearly one out of every five French voters in the country’s presidential election supported his daughter’s views on how France should act encouraged her father, the party’s founder.

Jean Marie Le Pen said: “I passed her the baton and she runs faster – good!”

Former paratrooper Le Pen created shockwaves years ago when he convinced more voters than the Socialist candidate and placed second in the first round of the presidential ballot, behind the conservative Jacques Chirac, who won in the second round of voting.

Then Nicolas Sarkozy in 2007 succeeded in seducing enough National Front voters to back him, paring down the party’s gains.

Le Pen senior had been climbing steadily in the presidential polls since 1988, yet Sarkozy’s appeal on some core beliefs of Front voters undermined the far right.

His media-savvy successor then booted the party back up.

Marine Le Pen’s campaign stalwarts appear thrilled with the younger leader’s effective rehabilitation and the approval of the French electorate.

Gilbert Collard, head of the FN support committee, said: “We are the new right. For Sarkozy it seems to be over. Marine Le Pen is already the head of the opposition. When we see the President of the Republic’s score we have to ask ourselves, comparing it with Marine Le Pen and say, objectively, haven’t people understood that we’re in a new world and need a different perception of what the right will be.”

The head of the IFOP polling institute suggested the Front is playing Sarkozy and his UMP party’s difficulty for all it is worth.

IFOP’s Frederic Dabi said: “It’s the first time in France that a president running for re-election has not come out first in the first round of voting, so he can’t create a dynamic.”

If that assessment is true, then the incumbent risks leaving office after 6 May. That is Marine Le Pen’s dream scenario. She is betting on the UMP imploding in the aftermath, so that the National Front can make major capital out of legislative elections in June, and enter the Assemblé Nationale in force. of becoming the party’s leader.

The news that nearly one out of every five French voters in the country’s presidential election supported his daughter’s views on how France should act encouraged her father, the party’s founder.

Jean Marie Le Pen said: “I passed her the baton and she runs faster – good!”

Former paratrooper Le Pen created shockwaves years ago when he convinced more voters than the Socialist candidate and placed second in the first round of the presidential ballot, behind the conservative Jacques Chirac, who won in the second round of voting.

Then Nicolas Sarkozy in 2007 succeeded in seducing enough National Front voters to back him, paring down the party’s gains.

Le Pen senior had been climbing steadily in the presidential polls since 1988, yet Sarkozy’s appeal on some core beliefs of Front voters undermined the far right.

His media-savvy successor then booted the party back up.

Marine Le Pen’s campaign stalwarts appear thrilled with the younger leader’s effective rehabilitation and the approval of the French electorate.

Gilbert Collard, head of the FN support committee, said: “We are the new right. For Sarkozy it seems to be over. Marine Le Pen is already the head of the opposition. When we see the President of the Republic’s score we have to ask ourselves, comparing it with Marine Le Pen and say, objectively, haven’t people understood that we’re in a new world and need a different perception of what the right will be.”

The head of the IFOP polling institute suggested the Front is playing Sarkozy and his UMP party’s difficulty for all it is worth.

IFOP’s Frederic Dabi said: “It’s the first time in France that a president running for re-election has not come out first in the first round of voting, so he can’t create a dynamic.”

If that assessment is true, then the incumbent risks leaving office after 6 May. That is Marine Le Pen’s dream scenario. She is betting on the UMP imploding in the aftermath, so that the National Front can make major capital out of legislative elections in June, and enter the Assemblé Nationale in force.

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